The truth will set us free

I’ve lived through about a dozen presidents now. Some were good. Some not so good. But this is the first time in my life a president has given me cause to fear for my country’s stability — not only from potential sources without, but mainly from sources within.

We are a nation divided, not united. And the division is growing. We seem to be polarized as varying degrees of conservatives or liberals, ranging from moderate to extreme to radical. We seem to have a White House that is virtually “dead in the water,” and which is run by a president who, while campaigning, promised Americans the moon, and who isn’t even able to hand out free cheese. He is too preoccupied with his own potential legal problems, with cranking out more of his self-destructing tweets, and with perpetually trying to remind us of how he won his election by a “landslide.”

I believe it is time for all of us to try to put party politics on the back burner and to put America on the front. We need to address the problem of cleaning up our government so that it may function as our Constitution intended, which is what our president promised to do. He promised repeatedly to “drain the swamp.” Instead, he merely threw more alligators into it.

As Americans, there is something we can all do about this next year — vote. We owe it to ourselves, and our country, to study each candidate, by using reality as a measuring stick, and to really listen to their messages.

We need the truth. Our country needs the truth. The truth, if we have the courage to face it, will eventually help us to heal. The empty promises of an egotistical, crowd-stirring carnival barker will not. They will only serve to further divide us.

— M. D. Bence

Sugar Hill

Confederate statues must be lawfully removed

I’m concerned that this recent spate of monument lawlessness will see criminals attempt to topple the various Confederate war monuments around Atlanta and its suburbs. Though I do not side with the Confederacy and their main reasons for fighting, I believe the chaos that comes from the unlawful destruction of these monuments will lead to no good end for our cities.

I firmly believe the decision for or against the removal of monuments must be discussed locally like rational citizens with decisions being made locally. Those who oppose this process are enemies to the political system we all enjoy that protects the very right for one to voice such an oposing opinion. We must proceed rationally and calmly in these areas and show the rest of the nation that we can peacefully come to a resolution. Otherwise we encourage chaos and division that will only rot us from the inside out.

Please know that many do not oppose the lawful consensus that would see the removal of such monuments so much as the lawlessness with which they are torn down without clearheaded discussion or vote.

— Adam Rhinehart

Sugar Hill