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Over the years, I have had the honor and pleasure of assisting, staffing and supporting both Democratic and Republican candidates and officeholders, from the U.S. Senate and Georgia's Governor's office to sheriffs and local county commissions. There are certainly differences in philosophy and approach between the two major parties, but good people still exist and seek careers in public service on both sides of the aisle.

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Have you had “the dream?” I posed that question on Facebook recently, and was astonished to learn that almost everyone has.

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White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain brought criticism on himself last week when he retweeted a post from Harvard economist Jason Furman. Furman claimed that rising inflation and nationwide supply chain issues that have delayed products from reaching store shelves is a "high-class problem."

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Britain's Home Office says more than 12,500 migrants have broken the law to get into the UK so far this year. Compare this to the nearly 200,000 migrants who have crossed the nearly nonexistent southern border just in July of this year.

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What is the greatest threat to educating children today? Is it COVID-19, or ignorance? I'm going for number two. There is growing evidence to back me up.

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Though Washington, D.C., and our U.S. Congress can still produce leaders, and I have hopes that our White House will again be home to a unifying and charismatic leader who can inspire our nation, I have come over time to believe that true innovation, catalysts and successful pilot initiatives for societal change more often now "bubble up" from local communities, cities and the states. Bottom up, versus top down. One of the more exciting initiatives coming in view, and now underway in 89 cities dotting our national landscape is aimed at making homelessness a rare, temporary and solvable problem. Before you roll your eyes and skip to the next article or column, take a moment and look at the work of "Built for Zero. Community Solutions." https://www.joinbuiltforzero.org/

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CBS Sunday Morning recently aired a story about Mount Airy, North Carolina, the inspiration for Mayberry of “Andy Griffith Show” fame. Ted Koppel interviewed the townsfolk, who reflected on Mount Airy’s sixty-year run as America’s idyllic depiction of life in the slow lane.

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My home office is a small study directly off of my bedroom. When I traveled a lot, I used to love coming home to my cozy, intimate office. It was set up exactly the way I like it, beautiful desk, great view, even scented candles.

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The Pandora Papers, released by The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) on Sunday, is not equivalent to the Pentagon Papers, which revealed how the U.S. government lied to the public about the Vietnam War, but it might serve the political ends of the left.

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A month from this week, the bulk of Georgia's 500+ cities will be holding their elections for city douncil, mayor, and other municipal offices. Most counties will begin advance voting in two weeks.

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It is a metaphor for what is occurring at seemingly all levels of our country and culture. The United States Postal Service (USPS) has announced it will slow service for first-class mail and periodicals while "temporarily" increasing prices on all "commercial and retail domestic" packages ... because of the holidays. It's probably good the announcement did not come through the mail, or it might have been delayed.

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After a country supper in the days of my growing up, Mama would often stand up from the table and say, “Ronda, you clean up the kitchen. I need to call Idell and see how she’s doin.”

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After last week's House vote that saw all but one Democrat, Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-TX), and no Republicans vote for the Women's Health and Protection Act, a bill that would establish a federal right to an abortion, the party that once claimed to stand for "the little guy" -- the littlest being the unborn baby -- has now hit the trifecta. It has become the party of death, debt, and debauchery.

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The reality of a strong Republican win/loss ratio in the November 2020 General Election is a fact that gets lost in the rearview of the ongoing claims of conspiracy and stolen votes, resulting in the loss of the White House by then-President Donald J. Trump. The GOP narrowed the Democratic House majority to only four seats, and lost only one U.S. Senate contest in Colorado, with that majority also on the line. Two Georgia seats were won by the Republicans by strong plurality, but just under a majority, requiring runoffs, which the Democrats would later sweep.

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Since our last visit, I have been busier than usual. Life’s parade includes events of joy, like a son’s wedding (exhilarating, but tiring). Life also throws you a curve ball, such as the funeral for a beloved brother-in-law (COVID-19 strikes again). Mix in a full-time job, a couple of side gigs, and a rainy September encouraging lush green grass to grow, and I’m that dog chasing his tail, nonstop.

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It was many years ago now that I stopped by the post office to gather mail. Among the bills was a small ivory envelope. My name, though misspelled, was presented in printed hand. The postmark was from a Midwestern state.

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Following the death of Mao Zedong, former president and founding father of the People's Republic of China, more than 40 years ago, his successor, Deng Xiaoping, instituted economic reforms that looked less like classic communism and more like capitalism.

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Whether you are a Democrat or a Republican, liberal or conservative, there is one thing that should unite one and all – how government spends your tax dollars. In Georgia, the best way to know that is through the state’s Open Records law.

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As wonderful as a diner breakfast is, more people, getting hit by inflation across the board, are choosing to stay home and eat a bowl of Wheaties or Kix instead.

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When my local daily newspaper announced they were going all-digital, the response was fast and furious.

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It did not feel like Christmas morning, or even a birthday, the late afternoon that I received the offer of my first job.

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One day I walked into Tink’s home office where he usually sits in an overstuffed chair decorated in bold flowers of orange, yellow and green. His feet were slung out on the matching ottoman.

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Whether you are a Democrat or a Republican, liberal or conservative, there is one thing that should unite one and all – how government spends your tax dollars. In Georgia, the best way to know that is through the state’s Open Records law.

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I'm standing at the precipice, looking down into a sparkling, new state-of-the-art, 3,500-seat amphitheater, wondering in part how it got here in the charming Southern Crescent town of Stockbridge. It occurs to me during the tour that follows that this is a town that has taken advantage of the "down-time" brought on by this pandemic, taking stock of its assets as well as its liabilities, and deciding to make some additions. The venue is so new it doesn't yet have a name, but it will open a bit later this month, with Georgian Gladys Knight and the peerless Patti LaBelle. Stockbridge, now the largest municipality in Henry County (the seventh most populous in Georgia), may be due for a diva wattage overload on Saturday, Sept. 25th at 7 p.m.

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Responding to Democrats in her party who are troubled by the massive $3.5 trillion spending bill that would forever transform America into a debtor nation, Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked a question: "Where would you cut?"

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Two weeks ago in this space, I asked readers to help find some new faces to lead the presidential tickets in the 2024 election. “We need a fresh start,” I wrote. I expressed concern that a couple of elderly guys, Joe Biden and Donald Trump, are the current front-runners for 2024. I suggested that the leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties find candidates who are focused on the future, rather than deciding whether they should buy green bananas.

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Sometimes in the twilight of a fading day, I sit for a spell on the back porch. Occasionally, I read but often times I just watch and listen.

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It is hard to find much good news these days as we relive the horrific events of 9-11 that took the lives of 2,977 innocent souls in the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

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Here’s another interesting COVID-enabled trend to ponder: More Americans are leaving big cities and the suburbs to live in rural communities, according to NextAvenue.com.

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For 20 years since Sept. 11, 2001, U.S. presidents have been saying their anti-terrorism policies have worked, as evidenced by no new attacks on America. 

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