Former test administrator pleads guilty in college admissions scandal

Igor Dvorskiy, a former Southern California test administrator accused of taking bribes in the college admissions scandal, has pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit racketeering, according to the US Attorney's Office in Massachusetts. Full credit: Nathan Klima/

Igor Dvorskiy, a former Southern California test administrator accused of taking bribes in the college admissions scandal, has pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit racketeering, according to the US Attorney's Office in Massachusetts.

Dvorskiy administered SAT and ACT tests at the West Hollywood Test Center in Los Angeles and accepted almost $150,000 in bribes from the mastermind of the scheme, William "Rick" Singer, to allow another individual, Mark Riddell, to take tests for prospective students, federal prosecutors in Boston say.

Clients paid Singer between $15,000 and $75,000 per test and Dvorskiy was paid approximately $10,000 per test to permit the cheating, prosecutors said. Riddell was paid $10,000 per test, authorities said.

Actress Felicity Huffman's daughter was one of many prospective students who used the test center where Dvorskiy administered tests, authorities said.

When Felicity Huffman entered her guilty plea in May, the actress said she "had no knowledge of Mr. Singer paying Mr. Riddell and Mr. Dvorskiy."

Riddell pleaded guilty to two charges in April in exchange for his cooperation with investigators.

Dvorskiy, who also is cooperating with investigators, faces 24-30 months in prison, a fine and the forfeiture of $150,000 -- the proceeds from the offense. He also faces 12 months of supervised release and restitution in an amount that the court will determine at sentencing, according to the plea agreement.

If he provides "substantial assistance in the investigation or prosecution of another person who has committed a criminal offense," the US Attorney said, prosecutors would file a motion to recommend a lower sentence, according to the filing.

Dvorskiy recently agreed to testify in the college admissions scandal cases, if requested.

Twelve parents have been sentenced over the scandal. Sentences have ranged from probation to 5 months in prison.

CNN's Eric Levenson contributed to this report.