ATLANTA — A judge from the Georgia Court of Appeals is moving up to the state Supreme Court.

Gov. Brian Kemp Tuesday named Judge Verda Colvin to fill the vacancy left at the beginning of this month by Harold Melton, who stepped down as the state Supreme Court’s chief justice to enter private practice.

“It is an honor to appoint such an experienced and accomplished justice to our state's Supreme Court,” Kemp said. "With Justice Colvin on the bench, Georgia's highest court is gaining an immensely talented and principled judge who will help guide it in the years to come."

Colvin has served on the Court of Appeals since being appointed by Kemp in April of last year. Before that, she served for six years as a Superior Court judge in the Macon Judicial Circuit.

Prior to her appointment to the bench, Colvin was an assistant U.S. attorney in the Middle District of Georgia. Before that, the native of Atlanta was an assistant prosecutor in Clayton County and assistant general counsel at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta.

After receiving a dual bachelor’s degree in government and religion from Sweet Briar College in Virginia, Colvin earned a law degree at the University of Georgia.

Melton stepped down from the state Supreme Court July 1 after serving for 16 years and leading Georgia’s judicial system through the disruption to normal court activities caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Presiding Justice David Nahmias was unanimously elected by his colleagues to succeed Melton as chief justice.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Please log in, or sign up for a new, free account to read or post comments.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.

Trending Videos

Support Local Journalism

Now, more than ever, the world needs trustworthy reporting—but good journalism isn’t free. Please support us by subscribing or making a contribution today.