Thursday morning was a bit surreal for Todd Nash as he saw the house that had been in family for years sitting on the back of a truck and being hauled across the street.

The house, known to local historians and county officials as the Hudson-Nash House, was built by Thomas Hudson around 1840, but it had been owned by various Nash’s from different branches of the family since 1870. Todd Nash said the Nash family he comes from acquired the house in the 1950’s. He even lived in the house from 1993 to 1998 after graduating from college.

But on Thursday the house looked different from the way Nash remembered it. Gone was its front porch, replaced by a blue tarp that covered the entire two-story front side of the home as it was moved to the Yellow River Post Office park site.

“It is odd for me to see it like that,” said Nash, who co-owns Nash Chevrolet. “In my business, it would be like looking at a car without it’s hood.”

The moving of the Hudson-Nash House has been expected since the Nash family donated the home to Gwinnett County in 2017. It tied in to the history presented at the Yellow River Post Office, which Thomas Hudson operated and was already owned by the county. The house had been located across Five Forks Trickum Road from the park.

Gwinnett County Cultural Resources Manager Catherine Long said the house will be restored to its original 1840 appearance, meaning the porch that had been added years later by the Nash family will be gone for good. The county is looking forward to combining the house’s story with stories from the other buildings already on the park site.

In addition to the post office, the site includes a barn and the last remaining slave cabin in Gwinnett County. The cabin also belonged to Hudson, who was one of Gwinnett’s three representatives at Georgia’s secession convention in 1861.

“It’s really a wonderful opportunity to tell the entire and complete history of this site,” Long said.

One feature that county officials are especially excited about is the house’s detached kitchen, one of the last examples of such a kitchen left in the area. The kitchen was not moved along with the house on Thursday. It is expected to be moved at a later date.

“That will give us a great opportunity to interpret what that kitchen’s role was for the family, so that’s pretty exciting,” Long said.

County officials worked with Complete Demolition Services to first prepare the house for moving and then to actually move it across the street. Bette Conaway, who oversaw the move from the county’s end, said Walton EMC officials were also especially helpful in making the move possible.

The EMC had to move power lines at the park and across the street so the house could be taken off its old site and moved.

“They have been a gracious partner right from the start,” Conaway said.

Nash said donating house was a way for the family to save it from the encroachment of a widening Five Forks Trickum Road and construction in recent years of surrounding neighborhoods.

“The road widening brought (Five Forks Trickum) even closer to the house and we’ve been encompassed by several new residential developments,” Nash said. “We just thought that with those two factors, the house would begin to deteriorate or be picked over and vandalized so we thought the best thing would be to get it to the park over here and then have someone restore it back to its former glory.

“The whole county would (then) get to enjoy it versus one family.”

I'm a Crawford Long baby who grew up in Marietta and eventually wandered to the University of Southern Mississippi for college. Earned a BA in journalism (double minor in political science and history). Previously worked in Florida and Clayton County.

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