Two massive health systems in metro Atlanta announced the launch date of their imminent merger.

Northside Hospital and Gwinnett Health System will merge Aug. 28, according to a statement from the Northside Hospital communications team. The merger will increase the capacity of the health system and alter names of the Gwinnett Medical Center hospitals.

Otherwise, the health system said patients will notice virtually no changes to their treatment and care. Patient bills and statements will be addressed from Northside Hospital following the merger, and payments will be made to the same. For care received at Gwinnett locations prior to Aug. 28, patient bills will come from and be payable to Gwinnett Medical Center.

Gwinnett Medical Center locations will remain in network with all insurance plans it participated in prior to the merger.

The new system will have 1,636 inpatient beds, more than 250 outpatient locations throughout Georgia and nearly 21,000 employees and 3,500 physicians on staff. Gwinnett Medical Center-Lawrenceville will be called Northside Hospital Gwinnett. Gwinnett Medical Center-Duluth will be called Northside Hospital-Duluth. Gwinnett Extended Care will be known as Northside Gwinnett Extended Care Center. The Glancy Rehabilitation Center will be known as Northside Gwinnett Joan Glancy.

There will be no rapid signage changes, the health system announced.

There is a list of frequently asked questions on the merger website at https://northsidegwinnett.com/faq.

Northside Hospital and Gwinnett Health System were approved to merge in November 2017 by the State of Georgia Office of the Attorney General. In February, the Federal Trade Commission completed its review of the combination and gave its own approval.

Apart from the five main hospitals in Sandy Springs, Lawrenceville, Cumming, Canton and Duluth, the new health system will operate additional outpatient sites that encompass cancer treatment, imaging, surgical and urgent care.

Taylor Denman is a reporter born and raised in Gwinnett County. He came back home to seize the rare opportunity of telling stories about the county in which he grew up.