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Lisa McLeod

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McLEOD: Are you proud of your job?

When it comes to work, there are two stories you can tell yourself. You can tell a money story, or you can tell a meaning story. Which one would you rather have in your head everyday?

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McLEOD: How to persuade and engage in an ADD world

Persuading people doesn’t mean manipulating them. It means bringing your most creative best thinking self to the table. If you care about your cause, your message, or your product, think about your audience.

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McLEOD: How to make better decisions under stress

A critical decision is one that shapes your future, things that effect your career, your relationships, and your reputation.

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McLEOD: The big problem with optimists

Being an optimist doesn’t mean ignoring the facts; it means holding onto your enthusiasm in the face of them.

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McLEOD: How to solve the ‘I hate my job’ problem

Purpose drives profit, not the other way around. You don’t create purpose by making a profit; you make a profit by establishing a Noble Purpose.

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McLEOD: Your backstory matters

Intent is always more interesting than implementation. If you want to be more compelling, start sharing your backstory.

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McLEOD: Don’t be a guilty volunteer

The next time someone scans the room asking for volunteers, scan your own heart, if you find guilt instead of enthusiasm, please, put your hand down.

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McLEOD: Leadership lessons from Monica Lewinsky

Monica Lewinsky had the guts and grace to own her mistake and turn it into something better. That is the real definition of a leader.

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McLEOD: Don’t be the person who waits for someone else to start

Somebody has to start. You can be one of the people who holds back, waiting to see what everyone else is going to do. Or you can be one of the people who has the courage to bring your full emotional self into everything you do.

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MCLEOD: The biggest difference between success and mediocrity

If you’re a teacher, parent or leader, you want your people to be successful. The question you need to ask yourself is, do they know that?

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MCLEOD: Nothing wrong with a little exaggeration

The next time you want to make a point, consider using a story. And if you need some extra exaggeration, to make it more interesting, you can borrow some from my family.

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MCLEOD: The myth of 'the one thing'

Success or failure is never one thing; it’s lots of things.

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MCLEOD: Two wastes of time that shouldn't happen

Life is short. Meaningful human interaction is an excellent way to spend our limited time on this earth.

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MCLEOD: Why I taught my daughters how to be ambassadors in the fifth grade

World travel enlarges people. It’s a big wide world, the more you see of it, the more you appreciate it.

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MCLEOD: Why we trust strangers, but not people we know

We humans have cast our lot together. Trusting each other is the only way we’re going to get anything done.

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MCLEOD: The big question that changes everything

The big question — How would I want this handled if I were on the other side? — doesn’t simplify problems, it illuminates their complexity, which is exactly what is required to solve them.

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MCLEOD: Why trying to make your children happy makes everyone miserable

If you ask people what they want for their children, most will tell you that they just want their kids to grow up to be happy.

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MCLEOD: Turning advesaries into allies

Personally, and in business, mastering people skills is life’s big difference-maker. It’s not easy, but important skills are rarely intuitive. Mastering the art of winning people over is the difference between being surrounded by support and enthusiasm versus having do everything on your own.

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MCLEOD: Three ways to deal with a poison person

If you’re forced to co-exist with a poison person, don’t make the mistake of letting them inject their venom into your life. They may be the killjoy, but you’re the one inviting them to dinner every night.

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