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Health care a hot topic at Congressman Rob Woodall's town hall meeting

Congressman Rob Woodall addresses a question during a town hall meeting Thursday in Suwanee. (Staff Photo: Camie Young)

Congressman Rob Woodall addresses a question during a town hall meeting Thursday in Suwanee. (Staff Photo: Camie Young)

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Congressman Rob Woodall talks to constituents during a town hall meeting Thursday in Suwanee. (Staff Photo: Camie Young)

SUWANEE — Congressman Rob Woodall talked compromise, as he faced a divided audience during a town hall meeting in Suwanee Thursday.

People with views on both sides of the political spectrum questioned the congressman on the Affordable Care Act, as more stories of lost coverage and drastically increasing premiums have dominated recent months.

While Woodall said he does not support the law, he rejected one woman’s call for Republicans to allow the law to destroy the health care system so it can be rebuilt.

“I’m going to wake up every day and try to repeal Obamacare … but if you have not been destroyed by that program yet, I don’t want you to be destroyed tomorrow,” Woodall said, adding that some provisions, like extending a parent’s health care coverage to a young adult child up to age 26, have proven to be popular. “We can all agree America needed this debate, and we have now figured out what we want.”

Woodall told the crowd of more than 100 that he expects some improvements come soon.

“Little by little, the American folks are moving people on this issue. I think we are going to see movement on things,” he said. “I think the entire 2014 election year is going to surround this.”

But later he added: “Don’t let this issue become so hot button … that it takes away all opportunities to fix it.”

Other issues brought up during the town hall meeting came back to health care.

“We could all have free insurance; we could all have free education (if the country stopped sending foreign aid to other countries,” Teresa Ledford told the congressman.

But Woodall disagreed, saying that the money is only a small percentage of federal spending and the country gets “a good bang for our buck.”

“I would rather send a dollar than an American man or woman in uniform,” he said, linking the aid to national security.

Toward the end of the evening, Lawrenceville man Terry Stewart tried to change the subject to another issue that he said could solve many of the problems the health care law is causing.

“If we put people back to work, we won’t have to worry about it,” he said.