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Nash takes role in statewide association

Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan . Gwinnett County Commission Chairwoman Charlotte Nash delivers the annual State of the County address at the Gwinnett Center in front of hundreds of people on Wednesday.

Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan . Gwinnett County Commission Chairwoman Charlotte Nash delivers the annual State of the County address at the Gwinnett Center in front of hundreds of people on Wednesday.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- Charlotte Nash is now in line to head the statewide Association County Commissioners of Georgia.

Nash was sworn in this week as third vice president of the association, which means Gwinnett's commission chairwoman is slated to take the presidency in April of 2016.

"ACCG brings county government leaders together to work toward common goals and the good of our communities," Nash said in a press release. "I am proud to be a part of this fine organization, and I am honored to have been chosen by my peers to serve as one of its officers. I look forward to serving with a great group of officers and working closely with Ross King and his staff. Also, I want to congratulate the new ACCG President, Mike Berg. Mike is now Dawson County Commission Chairman, but he served in the 1980s as Gwinnett County District 3 commissioner."

ACCG was formed in 1914, when county officials came together to help fund the state's highway department. Now, the organization works on behalf of county officials and their communities in public policy, legislative advocacy, leadership development and other programs.

Nash, who was first named to the ACCG Board of Managers in 2012, a year after taking office in a special election in Gwinnett, was installed as ACCG's third vice president at a ceremony conducted by Georgia House Speaker David Ralston at its 2013 conference in Savannah. She was unopposed last year for her first full term as Gwinnett Board of Commissioners chairman.

"Chairman Nash has a tremendous background in county administration, operations and strategic planning that will not only allow her to serve as a mentor for her county peers from across the state but will also aid the association as we continue to expand our programs and services," ACCG Executive Director Ross King said of the Dacula woman, who worked for Gwinnett government for nearly three decades, including as county administrator. "Her ability to quickly assess situations, break down complex issues, develop workable solutions and explain them using a straight-forward manner has made her a very respected county leader in our state."