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Public comes together for day of prayer

Staff Intern: John Spruill  The Golden Notes Choir from Duluth First Baptist Church sing during the National Day of Prayer event at the Duluth Town Center on Thursday.

Staff Intern: John Spruill The Golden Notes Choir from Duluth First Baptist Church sing during the National Day of Prayer event at the Duluth Town Center on Thursday.

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Staff Intern: John Spruill Hailey Thornton, of Sugar Hill, prays during the National Day of Prayer event at the Duluth Town Center on Thursday.

DULUTH -- The National Day of Prayer was Thursday, when Christians around the country were invited to come together across denominations and pray.

The city of Duluth invited the public out to the Duluth Town Green and Amphitheatre to listen to leaders from different churches lead prayer.

"The city's tradition of recognizing the National Day of Prayer sends a message that our city values and relies on faithful citizens that pray for our protection and guidance," Duluth Mayor Nancy Harris said about the annual tradition.

Around 50 people braved the wind, chilly air and light drizzle to listen, sing and pray.

To start the event, members of the Golden Notes Choir of First Baptist Church in Duluth sang patriotic tunes. Some of those included "Yankee Doodle Dandy," "This Land is Your Land" and "I've Been Working on the Railroad," just to name a few.

Then several people took the podium, including Harris, Brooks Coleman and Minho Chung from Korean Church of Atlanta. A total of 11 people took the mic to pray for different things: the state of Georgia, Gwinnett County and the city of Duluth. There were also prayers for the government and military, education, churches, family and business.

The day ended with two songs performed by the seventh- and eighth-grade chorus of Perimeter Christian School.

Although the crowd was small, people walked away happy to be a part of the experience, such as Deanna Gilliam of Duluth. She attended with her two young children, who were 3 years and 5 months old.

"I want to show my children that prayer in an essential part of our lives and our country," she said. "I think it was excellent. I was encouraged to learn that many of our city leaders are believers in Jesus Christ. That means a lot to me. It's very important to our family."

Each year on the first Thursday in May, local churches, pastors, ministries and others come together across denominations, ethnicity and political lines to spend time together to praise, pray and worship.

Other events held Thursday were in Auburn, Snellville and Lawrenceville.