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Trolley Tours a nice way to see city

A summary of highlights from the New Lawrenceville Trolley Tours.


Staff Photo: John Bohn Shantel Coq and her daughter Sanai Coq, 7, of Grayson, take a trolley tour of historic Lawrenceville. The tours are held on Saturdays during June.

Staff Photo: John Bohn Shantel Coq and her daughter Sanai Coq, 7, of Grayson, take a trolley tour of historic Lawrenceville. The tours are held on Saturdays during June.

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New Lawrenceville Trolley Tours

A summary of highlights from the New Lawrenceville Trolley Tours.

A summary of highlights from the New Lawrenceville Trolley Tours.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Mary Long hosts a trolley tour of historical buildings and sights in Lawrenceville. The tour runs once each Saturday afternoon, during June.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Jeri Cogdell, of Lawrenceville, center, and John Crawford, of Duluth, center left, laugh at a joke told by Mary Long during a trolley tour of historic Lawrenceville. The tours run once on Saturday afternoon, during the month of June.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Mary Long, center, hosts a trolley tour of historic Lawrenceville. The tours run once each Saturday afternoon, during the month of July.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn A trolley comes to a stop on East Crogan Street in Lawrenceville, to board passengers for a tour of the historic sites of Lawrenceville. The trolley tour runs once, on Saturday afternoons during the month of June.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- Charles and Elizebeth Scruggs, veterans of historic tours and residents of Lilburn, said that the people in charge of the New Lawrenceville Trolley Tours were very informative, comparing the local tour to one she previously went on in Charleston, S.C.

"I'm gonna get other people to come with me and I'm going to go again." Elizebeth Scruggs said.

Rodney Camren, a local realtor, started the tours five years ago to help local merchants gain business during the recession. Mary Long, author and the city of Lawrenceville's honorary historian, narrates the tours.

Long humorously warns riders that they may need an interpreter for her accent since "it took my mother three syllables to say dog."

Long has information on almost every street in downtown Lawrenceville. Lucky Street, where Long grew up, was originally called Sassafrass Avenue before her mother requested to the city council that it be changed because she felt "we were so lucky to live here." Perry Street was named after Admiral Perry, a war hero from Gwinnett.

"I didn't realize there was so much history on every street." Latonia Prothro, a passenger and mother of two children, said. Prothro said that Long was very entertaining and that the goodie bags given at the end of the tour are "a nice bonus".

Long informed riders that city buildings in the South always have their entrances facing south and never north. "That's one of our ways of sticking it to the North."

"I like the humor and the reality of Mary's stories," said Jeri Cogdell, a Lawrenceville resident. "I've lived here for 20 years and I enjoyed getting to learn more about Lawrenceville."

Long said the United States Navy's motto "Don't give up the ship" was first said by Commodore James Lawrence, Lawreneville's namesake.

There are only two New Lawrenceville Trolley Tours left this season -- running from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday and June 29. Tours start at the fountain near La Cazuela, located at 179 West Crogan St. The tour concludes at the Lawrenceville Visitor Center where complimentary goodie bags are given to passengers that are donated by Lawrenceville's local businesses. The tours are first-come, first-served.

MOBILE USERS: Click here to view a video.

For more information, visit http://www.facebook.com/LawrencevilleTrolleyTours.