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GCPS could use local-made film in curriculum

Special Photo From left to right, Clyde Strickland, executive producer of 'American Made Movie," J. Alvin Wilbanks, Superintendent of Gwinnett County Public Schools andNathaniel McGill, one of the directors of the movie.

Special Photo From left to right, Clyde Strickland, executive producer of 'American Made Movie," J. Alvin Wilbanks, Superintendent of Gwinnett County Public Schools andNathaniel McGill, one of the directors of the movie.

SUWANEE -- Officials with Gwinnett County Public Schools recently announced that a documentary directed and produced by several local residents could soon be incorporated into the district's high school curriculum.

Directed by 1999 Dacula High School graduates Nathaniel McGill and Vincent Vittorio, "American Made Movie" examines the decline of America's manufacturing sector. It's relevant subject matter, said Superintendent J. Alvin Wilbanks.

"'American Made Movie' has much value as a supplement to our curriculum," said Wilbanks, stating that its content would resonate in the areas of social studies, American history, government, economics and career and technical education.

Debbie Daniell, k-12 director of social studies for GCPS, agreed.

"It will give a firsthand kind of oral history of people who have lived through the concepts and historical pieces we're teaching in our classrooms," Daniell said. "It kind of blends in with what we're trying to do in order to get our students ready to become productive citizens of this country."

According to its official website, "American Made Movie" is a documentary "examining the factors contributing to the decline of the American manufacturing workforce and the integral role consumerism plays in getting the economy back on track."

Clyde Strickland, executive producer, said he hopes to positively influence young people through the film.

"We can plant this seed at the student level," Strickland said. "My 11-year-old already thinks like that. Those are the minds we've got to get to. We have to change the mind set of the American people and their buying habits."

Daniell said officials with the district hope to incorporate the film into high school curriculum as early as fall 2013.

Wilbanks said it could also include study guides "to connect the story with the curriculum content being taught."

For more information, visit www.americanmademovie.org.