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Commissioners catch chickens in Norcross neighborhood

Staff Photo: John Bohn Gwinnett County Commissioner Tommy Hunter holds five young chickens that he trapped after the chickens had over-ran a neighborhood on Colony Court in Norcross. Hunter constructed a trap that the chickens were driven into. The captured chickens were taken away on Thursday.

Staff Photo: John Bohn Gwinnett County Commissioner Tommy Hunter holds five young chickens that he trapped after the chickens had over-ran a neighborhood on Colony Court in Norcross. Hunter constructed a trap that the chickens were driven into. The captured chickens were taken away on Thursday.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Gwinnett County Commissioner Tommy Hunter handles a hen that he assisted in trapping on Colony Court in Norcross. Hunter constructed a trap that chickens that had over-run the neighborhood, were driven into. The captured chickens were taken away on Thursday.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn A hen and her five chicks cross a driveway as Gwinnett County Commissioner Tommy Hunter assists in trapping chickens that had over-ran a neighborhood on Colony Court in Norcross. Hunter constructed a trap that these chickens were driven into. The captured chickens were taken away on Thursday.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Gwinnett County Commissioner Tommy Hunter constructs a trap that was used to trap chickens that had over-ran a neighborhood on Colony Court in Norcross. The chickens were driven into this trap and removed from the neighborhood on Thursday.

NORCROSS -- County Commissioner Tommy Hunter bled a little Thursday in the name of public service.

Fellow Commissioner Lynette Howard got poison ivy.

The pair got dirty Thursday, helping out a Norcross neighborhood over-run by wild chickens.

"That's what I ran for," Hunter said of getting hands-on with a public problem, after residents complained about more than 50 fowl in their community at a recent town hall meeting.

Howard, who represents the Norcross neighborhood off South Norcross-Tucker Road, had thought that animal control had taken care of the problem, but residents said the traps officials set did little to catch the critters, who have multiplied since a neighbor abandoned a roost years ago when they learned keeping the animals was against a county code.

Hunter, who grew up on a Buford farm, said he thought he could help out, and last month he was able to catch about 18 fowl.

In the 95-degree heat Thursday, he set a trap made from chicken wire and PVC pipe, and Howard and a few others worked to scare the chickens in that direction. In less than an hour, a hen and five babies (biddies) had been captured.

"It worked like a charm," Hunter said. "... We commissioners might not be much, but we are smarter than a chicken."

LePret Williams said she has noticed a difference since the officials began their mission but said the aggressive roosters can still be a problem.

"I'm tired of these clucking chickens," she said. "It's been miserable living with these chickens for five years."

Williams' 10-year-old son Solomon helped in the endeavor.

"This is fun," he said, adding that he usually stays away from the fowl. "It's OK, but once they start chasing you, it's not fun anymore."

Comments

kevin 10 months, 1 week ago

Better they do this than work on raising our millage rate.

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NewsReader 10 months ago

I'm glad to see we are making such good use of our time! LOL!

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pcjohn 10 months ago

Good going, Tommy H. Your predecessor would have solved the problem by contracting a high-priced service and passing the cost to the taxpayers. People who grow up on farms learn how to solve problems quickly and cheaply; their livelihood depends on it.

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LilburnLady 10 months ago

His predecessor would have contacted a high-priced consulting firm to "study" the problem, create a project plan, draft an environmental impact study and then send it out for a bidding process. A crony would be picked as the project contractor, and by that time, there would now be 1,000 chickens to round up, creating a need for cost overrides. PETA would picket the jobsite calling for a "chicken sanctuary" to be created so that the hapless birds could live out their lives in government-funded luxury. The commissioner, apprised of the fact that all of the birds could not be rounded up within the budget allowed, would then run for governor based on a "chicken in every backyard" platform.

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pcjohn 10 months ago

Now that was well said Lilburn gal. I'm still laughing. But watch out....Beaudreau has some boyfriends who get riled up when they hear his name taken in vain.

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Kent 10 months ago

LilburnLady let me add this. He would probably spend hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars to construct a chick tunnel so the chickens could cross the road safely. If I remember correctly, he gained experience on such projects with the tunnel he had built @ major taxpayer expense at his favorite private golf course hang out in S. Gwinnett.

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R 10 months ago

Don’t forget the 10 year no compete consent decree award to the sole non competitive - competitive bidding winner…

For a fee

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notblind 10 months ago

5 years ??!?!?? A couple of kids with BB guns could have solved the problem in 5 minutes !!! WOOOOO !!!!! FRIED CHICKEN FOR DINNER !!!! . . Opps, this isn't the 60's is it ???

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Pompano 10 months ago

That's a great one @LilburnLady! Dead-on & the funniest thing I've read all day.

Thanks for the laugh!

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