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New skills learned at Girl Scout camp

More than 350 girl scouts participated in the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park.


Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan — Lindsey Berry, 6, throws up here hands while dancing as Sarah-Kate Brooks, right, and their troop run in a circle during in the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park Friday. This years theme was "Rockin' Road Trip, where the scouts learned about geography around the country.

Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan — Lindsey Berry, 6, throws up here hands while dancing as Sarah-Kate Brooks, right, and their troop run in a circle during in the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park Friday. This years theme was "Rockin' Road Trip, where the scouts learned about geography around the country.

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Sights and sounds from the Lilburn Girl Scout Day Camp

More than 350 girl scouts participated in the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park.

More than 350 girl scouts participated in the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park.

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Taylor Jones, 8, left, lets Shelby Lewis, 8, pick an arts and craft from her hat during a swapping session at the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park Friday.

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Jamie Kozozemski, 15, holds the hand of Amelia Cleveland, 11, while leading about two dozen girls from the cadet 1 and 4 group through a stream during the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park Thursday. This years theme was "Rockin' Road Trip, where the scouts learned about geography around the country

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More than 350 girl scouts dance during a concert at the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park Friday.

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Girl Scout Kennedy Boyle, 5, works on her cutting skills with a plastic knife and a bar of soap during the 32 annual week long Lilburn Day Camp at Lilburn City Park Thursday.

LILBURN -- During a humid Friday afternoon, Natalie Hanson sat under a tree with her friends Clara Allison and Olivia Held giggling and chewing on sunflower seeds.

The three 10-year-olds in troop Junior 7 were celebrating their last day at the Lilburn Girl Scouts Day Camp in Lilburn City Park.

Monday thorugh Friday, the girls and hundreds of other Girl Scouts learned scouting and real life skills -- while having fun.

"We did orienteering, where we worked with compasses, which was really fun," Hanson said. "We also did some cooking to make s'mores and monkey bread."

But at the end of the day, Hanson said she's going to miss Allison and Held as well as other folks she met during the week.

"I made a lot of new friends --I'm really going to miss them," she said. "I'm also going to miss my troop leaders."

For the 32rd year, the camp in Lilburn hosted more than 350 scouts, 95 staff members and volunteers and 80 camp assistants, Girl Scouts who are in the eighth to 12th grade. This year the camp's theme was Rockin' Road Trip.

Throughout the week, the girls were assigned to a state and needed to learn everything about it.

The Daisy 1 troop selected Kentucky. The gaggle of 6-year-old girls tried to remember their facts, but they could only remember one: the state's nickname.

"We know it's nicknamed the green grass state ... no blue grass," Rosalyn Nies said while pointing at her outline of the state pinned to her hat.

To represent as many states as possible, there was a "concert" held Friday. The troops and their leaders danced to tunes played by the DJ, which included Miley Cyrus' "Party in the USA" and Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama."

For Friday's meal, Tiffany Joyner of Lilburn was head of the cookout. She and her crew prepared regional meals from around the nation. Samples were later put out for the girls to try. Joyner was serving everything from cornbread made in box ovens to a whole chicken on a spit, to brown bread cooked in cans that were heated over hot coals -- like eating over a camp fire.

As the second year co-chairs, Pam Freeman and Lyn Risher wanted the attendees to learn new and useful skills to accompany the arts and crafts.

"We sat down with a group of other leaders and talked about what we did when we were younger (at camp)," Risher said.

With that, they added (plastic) knife skills, fire building and orienteering to the activities. In Thursday's rain, the knife work was the cleanest area at camp -- the girls were carving into bars of soap.

At another tent, a mad scientist area was erected. The scouts tried to make a boat that would go across the sewer using a water bottle, aluminum foil, paper clips, tooth picks, plus other odds and ends.

It's these types of puzzles and activities Risher believes with help the girls grow into women who can think on their toes.

"When you see them when they are little and grow, they develop leadership skills and real life skills they can use," she said.

Shannon Smith of Lilburn was one of the many volunteers at the camp. Two of her children were attending the camp, so Smith was the head of the arts and crafts area.

She enjoys coming back just as much as her children do.

"It's the camaraderie, friendships and they learn a lot of new things," Smith said. "My daughter is a Daisy and she always comes home with little facts to tell me."

She plans to come back next year.

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