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Heart Association campaign set to Bee Gees' hit

Why learn hands-only CPR?

  • Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death. Nearly 360,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States.
  • When a teen or adult has a sudden cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately getting CPR from someone nearby.
  • Sadly, about 90 percent of people who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene.
  • Most Americans (70 percent) feel helpless to act during a cardiac emergency because they don’t know how to administer CPR or they’re afraid of hurting the victim.

Disco can save lives

Hands-Only CPR has two steps: If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, call 911, and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the disco song “Stayin’ Alive.”

According to the American Heart Association, people feel more confident performing Hands-Only CPR and are more likely to remember the correct rhythm when trained to the beat of the disco classic “Stayin’ Alive.”

“Stayin’ Alive” has more than 100 beats per minute, which is the rate you should push on the chest during CPR.

ATLANTA — On national CPR week, the American Heart Association is promoting two steps to perform hands-only CPR using a hit song from the 1970s.

The AHA said in a press release that sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death with nearly 360,000 out-of-hospital cases each year in the U.S. So the AHA’s awareness campaign, in its second year, is being promoted with the beat of the Bee Gees’ hit song “Stayin’ Alive.”

Since survival rates drop as much as 10 percent for each minute without intervention, the AHA said “Stayin’ Alive” has more than 100 beats per minute, which is the rate to push on the chest during hands-only CPR.

Michael Privette, executive director of the Metro Atlanta American Heart Association, said the song’s beat is a fun way to remember the correct rhythm for CPR chest compressions.

“If you begin Hands-Only CPR to the beat of the Bee Gees’ ‘Stayin’ Alive’ immediately on a teen or adult who collapses from sudden cardiac arrest, you can double or triple their chances of survival,” he said.

The AHA said hands-only CPR is equally as effective as conventional mouth-to-mouth CPR, and people are more likely to feel comfortable performing it.

Chest compression-only CPR performed by bystanders keeps more people alive with good brain function after having a sudden cardiac arrest, an AHA study found.