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Local moms pen book about 'surviving West Point'

Staff Photo: Frank Reddy Local women Debroah Roszel, left, and Lisa Joiner penned a book called "The Mom's Guide to Surviving West Point," a how-to style tome that answers questions and aims to help mothers coping with the separation anxiety they might face as their child attends the United States Military Academy.

Staff Photo: Frank Reddy Local women Debroah Roszel, left, and Lisa Joiner penned a book called "The Mom's Guide to Surviving West Point," a how-to style tome that answers questions and aims to help mothers coping with the separation anxiety they might face as their child attends the United States Military Academy.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- Two local women have penned a book that aims to help moms cope with the separation anxiety of having children who attend the United States Military Academy.

Lawrenceville resident Lisa Browne Joiner said that "The Mom's Guide to Surviving West Point" got its start from discussions in a Facebook group she created called "West Point Moms."

"We used a lot of the questions that West Point parents all had in common," said Joiner, whose son, Matt, graduated in 2012 from the institution.

Joiner met fellow author Deborah Roszel through the Facebook group and found they had much in common. They debuted the book in June 2012, and it sold 500 copies in the first month "because moms just want to know," and it's been selling steadily ever since.

Much of the books lesson, said Roszel: "trust your kid and trust the system. That's the two things we like to teach."

Roszel's son, Mason, 23, also attended West Point.

Roszel said when parents drop their young cadets off at West Point "they soon realize they're not going to be 'mommy' anymore. It's no longer up to them. Their little baby is in the Army. You get the apron strings cut all in one blow You get a 90-second goodbye, and that's it. It's nice to have other moms along...to remind each other it's going to be OK."

Joiner said the book also aims to assist "helicopter parents...who hover. You can't do that at West Point. Your child is in the Army. They're not just in college. I have another son who went to UGA, and if I was missing him I could pick up the phone and call him or get in the car and go see him. It's not like that at West Point."

Joiner said that through the book she and Roszel try to "communicate to West Point parents the whole idea of 'letting go.'"

For more information, visit www.momsguidetosurviving.com.