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Buford Boy Scout earns Eagle Scout recognition

Special Photo Brian Dalrymple put into place a plan to reduce the heat island effect on the Gwinnett Technical Collegeis campus.

Special Photo Brian Dalrymple put into place a plan to reduce the heat island effect on the Gwinnett Technical Collegeis campus.

LAWRENCEVILLE-- As a community service project to earn his Eagle Scout rank, 16-year-old Brian Dalrymple put into place a plan to reduce the heat island effect on the Gwinnett Technical College's campus.

The Mill Creek junior immediately knew that he wanted to do his Eagle Scout project to help the school where his father works as the emergency services director.

"My dad works at the college and with him being there I've gone over there multiple times," Dalrymple said. "I've gotten to know a lot of people over there and with my Eagle project it has to benefit the community. So I thought, what could be more beneficial than helping a school that thousands of kids go to every year."

He was able to organize and complete a project aimed at helping Gwinnett Tech plant additional trees in an attempt to minimize the heat island effect on their campus.

Dalrymple was first interested in the topic of heat islands after learning about them in school and through his Boy Scout troop. Heat islands can occur when there is an increase in infrastructure along with a decrease in vegetation.

Dalrymple explains how more trees and plants can help, "The shade provided by trees prevents the sun from hitting the ground and heating it up and it keeps the ground cooler."

Before beginning the project, he was required to write a proposal and get it approved by the Eagle Scout Board. His project proposal was accepted in January 2012 and Dalrymple was then able to take action.

He consulted the Gwinnett Tech grounds manager and undertook the project to add 21 trees, 1,400 small plants and 100 bales of pine straw to the campus. Luckily, Gwinnett Tech had a fund set aside to take on such a large task. However, Dalrymple was also able to fundraise to pay for a portion for the project.

The task took more than 194 hours of work and assistance from the grounds staff as well as Dalrymple's Boy Scout Troop 1534 from Buford.

After more than three weeks of work from February to April, Dalrymple was able to reduce the heat island effect, conserve water and control soil erosion at Gwinnett Tech. He received the news that he earned the Eagle Scout rank in December.

As for his next project, Dalrymple said he is most looking forward to helping his friends and fellow troop members complete their Eagle Scout projects.

"There's a lot of people in my troop who are starting their Eagle Scout projects, so I'm going to be there for them and help them out with their projects," he said.

According to Dalrymple, the hardest part about completing his project was learning the organization and leadership skills that the Eagle Scout Board was looking for.

His father Alan Dalrymple feels that what his son has learned through this project will help him in whatever he decides to pursue in the future.

"He has the confidence that he knows he can take on a task," Alan Dalrymple said. "He also found out that not every task is as easy as he might think it is. He now understands about time management and he understands about interacting with others."

Comments

R 1 year, 2 months ago

Congratulations for an honor that requires a great deal of work …

Our local area is just a little bit better for your efforts.

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