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Dacula mom blogs, writes about autism

Marnie Witters gives a parent’s perspective

Marnie Witters of Dacula writes blogs about autism and reviews iPad apps for children with special needs. She poses with her sons, left, Jadon, 8, and right, Harrison, 9, in front of their Christmas tree. (Photo: Marnie Witters)

Marnie Witters of Dacula writes blogs about autism and reviews iPad apps for children with special needs. She poses with her sons, left, Jadon, 8, and right, Harrison, 9, in front of their Christmas tree. (Photo: Marnie Witters)

DACULA — Marnie Witters has been a writer for the past two decades.

She started out working at the DeKalb Neighbor newspaper, then she transferred to technical writing and design, working at several IT companies in and around Atlanta.

Things changed after the birth of her first son, Harrison, who is ADHD.

“I took a pretty big career change leaving an IT job and I came to home-school my son,” the Dacula resident said. “Then I started looking for blogging opportunities.”

A year later, Witters gave birth to her second son, Jadon, who has high functioning autism.

She took her writing a new area: autism and special needs.

“How I got into the writing now … was really through my son,” the mother of two said. “I want to be a voice for him and other families walking out the autism journey. I want to show others there’s nothing to be scared of about autism and there are so many resources available. I recommend to parents they take full advantage because the sooner the better.”

Witters is a writer and blogger for a couple of autism websites and her Facebook page, Autism Made My Day. She writes about being a parent of an autistic child, providinge resources, advice and suggestions.

She also reviews iPad apps for autistic and special-needs children.

“The site will assign me apps that are developed for autistic and special-needs kids with even visual impairments or speech delays,” Witters said. “I look at a lot of iBooks, eBooks and Dr. Seuss apps.”

Most of the applications are visually based.

“Autistic kids learn visually,” she said. “They can recognize words with pictures. We get good feedback (about the apps) because I’m looking at the items as a parent and I let my son use them, too.

“I have a tech writing background and a smart son and both came together to give me an opportunity to really help others through my writing.”

Through all of this, Witters also tutors at her son Harrison’s home-school group.

“It’s easier to make time for all of this since the subjects overlap,” she said. “My youngest keeps us all organized. It’s funny how it all works together at the end of the day.”

Right now, Witters writes for Autism Plugged In, iPad Kids, Covenant Connections Church in Flowery Branch and Autism Made My Day.