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Gwinnett filmmakers end 32-day tour in Atlanta

“American Made Movie” directors and 1999 Dacula High School graduates Vincent Vittorio, left, and Nathaniel McGill make one of their last 32-day tour stops at the Georgia State Capitol Monday morning. (Photo: Mike Amico of “American Made Movie”)

“American Made Movie” directors and 1999 Dacula High School graduates Vincent Vittorio, left, and Nathaniel McGill make one of their last 32-day tour stops at the Georgia State Capitol Monday morning. (Photo: Mike Amico of “American Made Movie”)

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Monday morning, the “American Made Movie” tour bus pulls up to the Georgia State Capitol in downtown Atlanta. (Photo: Mike Amico of “American Made Movie”)

ATLANTA — On July 5, local filmmakers kicked off their 32 cities in 32 days tour at Winton Machine in Suwanee.

On Monday, “American Made Movie” directors and 1999 Dacula High School graduates Nathaniel McGill and Vincent Vittorio wrapped the tour at the Georgia State Capitol with a small press conference and stories about their adventure.

The day the group arrived to Detroit was the day it filed for bankruptcy, Vittorio said to the crowd.

But the overall tour was a positive experience, according to the directors. Many people were excited to learn about how Georgia and Gwinnett County were taking initiatives adding more manufacturing opportunities to their communities.

“As an example in the film, we really focused on the Gwinnett Chamber of Commerce’s ability to attract and retain jobs over a period of where the recession took place,” McGill said. “And the way that Partnership Gwinnett and people get together to figure things out is a prototype example of how economic development works for the rest of the country. We used that as example of what local communities can do to bring manufacturing to the area.

“(Other cities) look at it as an example and repeat that it is an example, so it really does work out.”

The two and their team stopped by Birmingham, Ala., St. Louis, Pittsburgh and Washington, to name a few places. Along the way, they gave out “Be a Part Movement” Awards to those who discover and share solutions that will help them be a part of a better America. In Atlanta, it was handed to Blake Ashbee, executive director at the Governor’s Office of Workforce Development, to honor the Go Build Georgia program.

This program is “designed to educate young people on the value of learning a trade, dispel their misconceptions about the skilled trade industry and inspire them to consider building a career as a skilled tradesman.”

What’s next? Perhaps another movie, according to McGill.

“This looks like this workforce development is critically important and we have to do something on it,” he said. “I hope there can be another film.”

“American Made Movie” is a documentary about America’s manufacturing sector. According to its official website, the movie is “examining the factors contributing to the decline of the American manufacturing workforce and the integral role consumerism plays in getting the economy back on track.”

It is slated to release on Aug. 30 nationwide at selected AMC Theatres and Regal Cinemas.

For more information about the flick, visit www.theamericanmademovie.com.