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SPOTLIGHT ON SPRING ARTS: Fernbank takes it to the 'extreme'

Photo: AMNH "Extreme Mammals" showcases the variety of extinct and living mammals with fossils, reconstructions and specimens.

Photo: AMNH "Extreme Mammals" showcases the variety of extinct and living mammals with fossils, reconstructions and specimens.

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Photo: Giant Screen Films Fernbank has recently opened its new IMAX film, "Titans of the Ice Age," to accompany he exhibit "Extreme Mammals."

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Photo: AMNH "Extreme Mammals" showcases the variety of extinct and living mammals with fossils, reconstructions and specimens.

IF YOU GO

• What: “Extreme Mammals” and “Titans of the Ice Age” IMAX

• When: Exhibit runs through Aug. 18, IMAX runs through Aug. 15, times vary

• Where: Fernbank Museum of Natural History, 767 Clifton Road, Atlanta

• Cost: Museum tickets $15.50 to $17.50; with IMAX $19 to $23

• For more information: Visit www.fernbankmuseu...

ATLANTA -- Have you ever stood next to an Indricotherium, which stood 15 feet tall? Or studied the skeleton of the Puijila darwini, which was known as the "walking seal?"

Well, here's your chance.

Fernbank Museum of Natural History is showing "Extreme Mammals: The Biggest, Smallest, and Most Amazing Mammals of All Time," which gives visitors a face-to-face glimpse at some of the diverse mammals that have lived on this planet. The venue also has "Titans of the Ice Age" on IMAX to complement the exhibit.

"'Titans of the Ice Age' is a great pairing with our 'Extreme Mammals' exhibition," said Lynn Anders, a biologist at Fernbank Museum. "Visitors can learn about these prehistoric animals as they encounter authentic fossils and incredible displays in the exhibition, and then see these creatures come to life on the IMAX screen."

In "Extreme Mammals," the animals on display are both extinct and living featuring fossils, specimens and reconstructions. Attendees can learn about each mammal through media displays, hands-on activities, computer interactives, touchable fossils, casts and taxidermy specimens (with the egg-laying platypus to a pair of Proboscis monkeys).Other "extreme" animals featured are the hoofed and multiple horned plant-eater Uintatherium and one of the oldest fossilized bats ever found. Plus there is a diorama of Ellesmere Island, which was located in the high Arctic 50 million years ago.

To accompany the exhibit, Fernbank recently released a new IMAX movie called, "Titans of the Ice Age," telling the story of the time period with everything from the wooly mammoth to saber-tooth cats.

"The film portrays very realistic footage of life on Earth during the last Ice Age, and does a great job of showcasing how scientists study fossil sites, like the incredible La Brea Tar Pits, to learn more about the life and death of these incredible creatures," Anders said.

The movie was filmed at Yellowstone National Park, the Northern Great Plains, the Rocky Mountains and Alaska with the Paleolithic humans, played by native Inupiat and Yup'ik Alaskans. The Ice Age mammals were later added by CGI.

"Audiences will experience the world of these prehistoric animals with a realism that only this canvas can provide," said Andy Wood, the film's producer."We are really proud to have worked with a distinguished team of scientists and partners to tell this story.The end result is a film that is both highly entertaining and revealing."