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Obama, after Boston bombing, thanks Putin for Russian cooperation

U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement on the Boston bombing from the White House in Washington April 16, 2013. Two bombs ripped through the crowd at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing three people, maiming others and injuring more than 100 in what a White House official said would be treated as an "act of terror."

U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement on the Boston bombing from the White House in Washington April 16, 2013. Two bombs ripped through the crowd at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing three people, maiming others and injuring more than 100 in what a White House official said would be treated as an "act of terror."

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama thanked Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday for Moscow's close cooperation on counterterrorism after the Boston Marathon bombings, and they agreed to continue working together on security issues.

The two brothers suspected in the bombing were ethnic Chechens who lived in Russia's Dagestan region more than a decade ago before moving to the United States with their family.

"President Putin expressed his condolences on behalf of the Russian people for the tragic loss of life in Boston," the White House said in a statement summarizing the leaders' phone call.

Obama "praised the close cooperation that the United States has received from Russia on counterterrorism, including in the wake of the Boston attack," the White House said.