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State House candidates discuss issues, goals

ELECTION COVERAGE

For complete coverage of the Nov. 6 general election, including previews, bios of local candidates, sample ballots and more, CLICK HERE

On Nov. 6, there are several newcomers as well as incumbents battling to keep their seats in the State House races. The candidates discuss a multitude of issues ranging from education and ethics reforms to transportation and natural resources from both sides of the aisle.

District 81

After winning the Republican position in July for District 81, Chris Boedeker is preparing to face off against Democratic incumbent Scott Holcomb on Nov. 6. The two men have different views and goals in mind while in office.

Boedeker, a conservative, wants to “restore the free-market principles of limited government and individual responsibility to Georgia’s state government.”

“I believe we can heal the damage done, here in Georgia, by the Obama economy, special interests and free-spending big government advocates,” he said. “To do this we must renew our commitment to conservative principles, and focus first on the priorities that matter most.”

Some of those priorities include the freedom to choose the schools your children attend (public, private or charter), eliminating state tax and reducing regulations for private businesses.

Holcomb on the other hand, wants both Democrats and Republican to work together to solve problems as a team, instead of using labels.

“If an idea is a good one and improves our state, it should be supported no matter who proposed it,” he said. “We’d all be much better off remembering that Republicans and Democrats don’t need to be enemies. Instead, we should be colleagues who come together to make government work.”

The issues Holcomb continues to focus on include improving education, helping Georgia’s veterans and their families, improving water supply and transportation problems, as well as “set the table for private sector growth” through partnership with the government.

Both candidates support an ethics reform for limiting the amount of gifts given to legislation and other public officials by lobbyists.

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Chris Boedeker

Chris Boedeker

Party: Republican

Age: 31

Education: North Gwinnett High School; bachelor’s degrees in economics and sociology from the University of Georgia

Occupation: Attorney

Political Experience: None

Family: Wife Jessica; one daughter and a newborn son

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

I believe that we must restore the free-market principles of limited government and individual responsibility to Georgia’s state government. Having grown up in Georgia and being active in my community, I have watched over the years as our state representative has used public office to pursue his own self-interest. What we need now is a servant-leader, guided by conservative principles.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Ethics reform is an important issue for the voters I have met with in House District 81. I believe that we can achieve sustained ethics reform by increasing the accountability of elected officials and lobbyists through effective penalties, and by developing a system for top to bottom transparency.

I will support legislation that makes meaningful efforts in the area of ethics reform. The first, and most basic, step is simply electing people of character and integrity who are not susceptible to the unethical dealings that undermine public trust in our elected officials. We can accomplish so much more as a people when we have the confidence that our elected officials will do the right thing, and as importantly, that they are held accountable when they don’t.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

As a conservative, I’m committed to making District 81 a safe haven for our country’s founding principles of limited government and economic prosperity through free market capitalism. I’m also committed to representing this district in a way that citizens of all political stripes can see demonstrable progress in areas where there is common ground to be found. We need to move past partisan politics for a change.

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Scott Holcomb

Scott Holcomb (i)

Party: Democrat

Age: 39

Education: Bachelor of arts from the University of Connecticut; Juris doctorate from West Virginia University; future MBA from the University of Georgia (Graduation in 2013)

Occupation: Attorney

Political Experience: State Representative, 2011-13, Public Safety and Homeland Security Committee, Defense and Veterans Affairs Committee

Family: Wife Kathleen, son Carter, 6, and daughter Kirsten, 1

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

I don’t think political labels are all that helpful because so many politicians say one thing and then do the exact opposite. For example, my opponent claims to be a fiscal conservative and against debt, but he has debt in his own campaign. Worse, labels tend to give politicians cover. I’d rather we be judged on something real. ... If you need a label for me, I’d choose “public servant.”

We need to fix our economy, we need to do a better job educating our children and we need to make the investments that will help our communities thrive over the next decades. Government has a role to play in that work. We need competent people with integrity in Georgia’s government in order to earn the public’s faith.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

My top goal for our state is to improve education so we can retain the jobs we have today and compete for the jobs of the future. My top personal goal for the next legislative session is to push for ethics reform. I support a ban on gifts to legislators and other public officials and I’d like to see that passed into law.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

Unlike my opponent, I bring a tremendous amount of real-world experience to the Capitol. ... I work hard, build consensus and I get results. I am also proud of the honest campaign I’ve run that has focused on the issues. My opponent has run an intensely negative and dishonest campaign that even included a false attack on my military service that has been described in the media as cowardly and mendacious. I am tired of the same old games, and based on what I am hearing from voters, they are, too.

District 93

A registered nurse from Snellville is challenging an attorney from Lithonia for the seat in House District 93. Christine “Tina” Hoffer, who has no political experience, is running against Dar’shun N. Kendrick, who holds the current seat in House District 94.

The women believe in being a “public servant” for their constituents, but that is the only thing they both have in common.

Kendrick thinks that her occupation gives her the credentials needed to stay in office.

“I’m a lawyer, a transactional business lawyer, which means that what I do for a living is draft and review and interpret legal documents,” she said. “This is what good ‘legislating’ is about — deciding the good bills from the bad bills based on statutory interpretation, so I am in my element as a legislator.”

Hoffer is confident her years as a registered nurse give her the qualifications to make the right decisions for her constituents.

“Though I have not worked in the political arena, my many years of health care experience, as well as graduate degree training, have uniquely prepared me in relating to people and in doing research to make well-informed decisions,” she said.

During the primary elections, Kendrick beat Democratic candidates Dexter Dawston and Glenn Williams while Hoffer ran unopposed.

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Dar’shun N. Kendrick

Dar’shun N. Kendrick (i)

Party: Democrat

Age: 30

Education: Bachelor’s degrees in political science and communications from Oglethorpe University; Juris doctorate from the University of Georgia; master’s in business administration from Kennesaw State University

Occupation: Attorney

Political Experience: State Representative from House District 94

Family: Single

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

My philosophy in general is that leadership is about service; service to my community, colleagues, constituents and those around me. ... There can be no leadership without service. I have dedicated my life to public service and it has driven the way I run my legislative office. Nothing matters to me more than constituent services and constituents come first, no matter what I am doing while serving on Capitol Hill.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Jobs and economic growth for which I proposed a bill last session to help with this. The second issue is foreclosure reform for which I proposed a bill.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

I’m not new to politics. Since the age of 18 I knew that public service was where I wanted to serve and dedicate my life to. I am the incumbent, representing 58,000 Georgians from DeKalb and Rockdale counties well in the General Assembly during the 2011 and 2012 sessions. I am young (compared to most in the General Assembly) and the second youngest member of the Georgia General Assembly and although some see that as a lack of experience, I believe I have accomplished a lot more than individuals my age, so imagine what I could do this next decade based on what I have done the last decade of my life.

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Christine Hoffer

Christine “Tina” Hoffer

Party: Republican

Age: 57

Education: Bachelor of arts from Houghton College; bachelor of science in nursing and master’s in nursing from Emory University; certified Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner

Occupation: Registered nurse

Political Experience: None

Family: Husband Mike

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

I believe that an elected official is called a public servant for a reason. This is a calling to serve and represent the people of the designated region. Serving means listening to the constituents’ concerns. It means communicating what is going on at the legislative level. It means gathering ideas from the community when seeking solutions to problems. It means making decisions and voting for policies that are in the best interest of the members of the community.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

I would like to introduce an Ethics Reform Bill that includes extensive financial disclosure requirements for the governor; a transparently run pension fund; an aggressive ethics enforcement agency (with teeth); tough anti-pay-to-play laws for contractors; financial disclosure requirements for every public official; a ban on all gifts to legislators and judges; online database for all campaign finance records; easy online access to government records and data; implementation of clearer conflict of interest laws, for both legislators and judges, disclosing all outside assets and directions for recusal; required “cooling off” time between when a legislator leaves office and when he can register as a lobbyist; citizen access to budget expenditures; and public input at hearings.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

I am the candidate who stands for traditional family values, including the definition of marriage as being between one man and one woman. I also believe every life is precious, including that of the baby yet to be born, regardless of how that baby was conceived. I also stand for all other vulnerable people, including the very elderly, the disabled and the disenfranchised.

Though I have not worked in the political arena, my many years of health care experience ­­— as well as graduate degree training — have uniquely prepared me in relating to people and in doing research to make well informed decisions.

District 95

Republican incumbent Tom Rice will face Democrat Brooke Siskin in a race that pits an experienced politician against a challenger who lists jobs as her top goal.

Rice, who has served in the House of Representatives for 16 years, said his top goal is implementing traffic reform as it relates to decriminalizing minor traffic offenses and addressing concerns in the teen driving area.

Rice said he believes in a conservative government philosophy.

“As a result I see my role as one, encouraging economic growth, two, provide a cost effective government and three, promote family values,” Rice said.

Siskin said the district needs ethical and accountable legislators to represent it in the State House.

“If elected, I will make every effort to address the needs and concerns of the constituents in District 95 instead of the special interest groups who are willing to buy my vote,” Siskin said. “I am a very energetic and motivated person who wants to see Georgia move forward and not backwards.”

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Tom Rice

Tom Rice (i)

Party: Republican

Age: 72

Education: Bachelor’s degree in accounting from Temple University

Occupation: Consultant

Political Experience: Sixteen years as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives; Chairman, House Motor Vehicles Committee

Family: Wife Frances, four children, 10 grandchildren

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

I subscribe to a conservative government philosophy. As a result, I see my role as one, encouraging economic growth, two, provide a cost-effective government and three, promote family values.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Top goal is to implement Title 40 Study Committee (Chairman) recommendations on decriminalizing minor traffic offenses and addressing concerns in the teen driving area.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

Sixteen years of experience, eight in minority, eight in majority; position of leadership as a Chairman, emphasis on more personal freedom with more personal accountability.

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Brooke Siskin

Brooke Siskin

Party: Democrat

Age: 44

Education: University of California at Davis

Occupation: Marketing representative

Political Experience: None

Family: Daughter Caitlin, 14

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

We need ethical and accountable legislators to represent us in the Georgia State House. If elected, I will make every effort to address the needs and concerns of the constituents in District 95 instead of the special-interest groups who are willing to buy my vote.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Bring back good, quality jobs to the district.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

Almost everything. I am a very energetic and motivated person who wants to see Georgia move forward and not backward.

District 96

In District 96, Republican Mark Williams and incumbent Democrat Pedro “Pete” Marin square off in the Nov. 6 elections.

Marin, the 10 year veteran in Georgia’s legislation who works closely with the Latino community, supports government as a “major role” in legislation.

“The legislature must play a major role in strengthening our economy and those sectors that support it,” he said. “I intend to focus on improving education, supporting initiatives to create more jobs and opportunities for small businesses, protecting homeowners from foreclosures and expanding opportunities for citizens to receive affordable health care. These are the issues parents, homeowners and business owners care about in Gwinnett County.”

Williams wants less government control because it is “controlling us.”

“We need leadership to rein in our out of control government,” he said. “The intrusion into our lives has gotten out of control. We need to give more control back to our local jurisdictions, and take away some control from state and federal.”

When asked about their opponent, Williams said that his community knows him, which makes him stand out. Marin believes his years working with both Republicans and Democrats will keep him in the State House.

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Mark Williams

Mark Williams

Party: Republican

Age: 50

Education: Berkmar High School; Georgia State University

Occupation: Printer, co-owner of Printing Trade Company

Political Experience: Chairman for five years of Gwinnett Place CID, former chairman of Gwinnett County Recreation Authority, Gwinnett County Revitalization Task Force

Family: Three adult children, James, Joshua and Jessica

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office.

We need leadership to rein in our out of control government. The intrusion into our lives has gotten out of control. We need to give more control back to our local jurisdictions, and take away some control from state and federal. I will focus on this philosophy as I study each bill that comes before me in the house.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Getting control of our government, instead of it controlling us. As Thomas Jefferson said, “A government big enough to give you everything you need, is a government big enough to take away everything that you have.” It’s too big and too powerful.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

I have a strong record of marching to the head of problems, and charging ahead with solutions, not just talking about them. Anyone that knows me, will tell you, “Mark gets things done.” The voters in my district know me. They have seen me working in their community for many years. That sets me apart. I’m not just doing something to show community service for a campaign. My stripes remain the same as before I decided to step up to run for office.

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Pedro "Pete" Marin

Pedro “Pete” Marin (i)

Party: Democrat

Age: 54

Education: Some college

Occupation: Business consultant

Political Experience: Appointed by Gov. Barnes to the Georgia Commission on Hispanic Affairs in 2001; State Representative House Districts 66-96 from 2003 to 2012

Family: Wife, Nereida, and, son, Joel, 28

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

I want to continue building upon my 10-year legislative record of supporting public policy that improves the lives of Georgians, reflects our ideals as a civil society and respects the diversity that now represents our state. Gwinnett County needs representation who will not cower to political expediency, but stand up for all citizens who look to government for leadership and responsiveness.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Strengthening our local economy has to be the priority for any state elected official representing Gwinnett County. Since taking office in 2003, I have authored numerous bills to provide local authorities the tools necessary to create jobs, improve infrastructure, support local businesses and position our county as a regional leader in key industries. Yet, there is still more work to be done. I intend to work with our county and municipal government to author policy that will reduce expenditures, increase revenue and allow for local governments to operate more efficiently.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

My experience as a five term state elected official, the respect I have from my Republican and Democratic colleagues, strong relationships with local elected officials and stakeholders in Gwinnett County, an ability to bring people together on issues of mutual importance and a desire to serve the citizens of Georgia with fidelity and humility.

District 101

A local real estate broker will challenge a former Central Gwinnett High principal in the District 101 race. Democratic challenger Timothy Swiney, a real estate broker, has built his campaign around the notion that the state is in sour shape because the last decade of Republican control has produced a lack of financial stability and security. Incumbent Valerie Clark, a Republican who served as principal for three schools in Gwinnett, said she would promote free enterprise with less regulation and lower taxes.

Both candidates ran unopposed in the July primary.

If elected, Swiney said he would support a ban on lobbyist gifts and the strengthening of ethics laws. Clark said she would promote education with tougher standards and smaller class sizes.

Asked what set her apart from her opponent, Clark said consistency is one of her strengths.

“What I am today is what I’ll be tomorrow,” she said. “My philosophy of government and dedication to the rights and needs of my constituents has never wavered or changed with the political winds.”

Swiney pointed to Clark’s career in an education system that has, “failed our students, teachers and parents.”

While Clark said on her web site that she is pro-life and opposes any government funding of abortion, Swiney said government should not play a role in end-of-life choices.

“I believe government should stay out of your uterus, out of your hospital rooms, and especially out of your death beds,” Swiney said.

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Valerie Clark

Valerie Clark (i)

Party: Republican

Age: 63

Education: Doctorate in educational psychology and educational leadership from the University of Georgia; master’s degree in special education from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; bachelor’s degree in English education from the State University of New York at Plattsburgh

Occupation: Retired educator

Political Experience: State Representative, member of Education Committee, Vice Chairman Education Subcommittee, Health and Human Service Committee Member, Human Relations and Aging Committee Member, Lake Lanier Caucus Member, addressing issues of the lake and surrounding basin

Family: Husband, Bob, children, Pearson, 23, Barrett, 21

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

I am a conservative Republican who believes in individual rights, personal freedom and liberty. I will vote for tax relief for both businesses and individuals, improvements in education and an open and responsive government.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

Promote free enterprise with less regulation and lower taxes. Promote education with tougher standards and smaller class sizes. Support public safety with good pay and the best equipment. Advocate for seniors.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

Consistency is one of my strengths. what I am today is what I’ll be tomorrow. My philosophy of government and dedication to the rights and needs of my constituents has never wavered or changed with the political winds. I’ll continue to bring the same whole-hearted dedication and energy to my service as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives.

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Timothy Swiney

Timothy Swiney

Party: Democrat

Age: 52

Education: Degree in respiratory therapy from University of Virginia and Mountain Empire College in Virginia

Occupation: Residential real estate broker and neonatal-pediatric respiratory specialist

Political Experience: None

Family: Two children

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

Georgia has been under complete Republican domination for a decade now so I ask, “How’s that been working for you, Georgia?” If you’re like me and most Georgia residents, it hasn’t been working out very well at all. Georgia has consistently ranked as one of the worst states in the nation for foreclosures, consumer bankruptcies, unemployment, uninsured workers and poverty level. We have been named the worst state in the nation for the financial security of our residents, and one of the worst states for retirees. Georgia Republicans are trying to blame our poor economy on the national policies, but the fact is if Georgia’s rotten economy were the result of the national climate, our state would be holding our own when compared to other states; instead, we are last. That is clearly a result of our own state’s leadership. As your state representative, I will work on behalf of the people, not a party nor a lobbyist group. Partisan politics have crippled our state economically and it’s time to have legislators who represent the people and not the party. My vote will be based on what is best for Georgia’s families and small businesses. Any legislation that does not promote the health, safety and security of our citizens will not receive my support.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

The obvious and most pressing concerns are the economy and ethics. After a decade of Republican control, Georgia is now ranked dead last in the financial security and stability of our residents. We have the second highest personal bankruptcy rate, collectively we have the lowest personal savings, one of the highest poverty rates, one of the highest unemployment rates, and Georgia is ranked the second worst state for retirees. One in four of Georgia’s children and one in five senior citizens are living in poverty. There is some good news, but not for hard-working Georgians. Georgia is ranked one of the top states in the nation for our pro-business environment. While Georgia’s hardworking families have suffered economic hardships, big business and corporations have flourished under Republican domination in Georgia. It should be obvious who is running our state government, and clearly it is not the people. We cannot continue to have hardworking citizens carry the entire burden of a failed economy. We need to streamline social programs, eliminate wasteful spending and have a complete overall of the tax system to insure that everyone, including big businesses and those here illegally, carry a fair share of the tax burden.

Georgia was recently named the worst in the nation for ethics and transparency in government. After 10 years of Republican domination, the GOP has broken the state Ethics Committee. They have reduced its size, budget and authority; effectively crippling our ability to investigate and prosecute ethics violations. Republicans have made Georgia a laughing-stock nationally in regards to ethics. As your state representative, I will support a complete ban on lobbyist gifts, and I will propose legislation to strengthen ethics laws. A “slap-on-the-wrist” is not a sufficient deterrent to prevent government corruption; violation of the public trust is a serious offense and should result in mandatory jail time.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

My opponent is a retired school administrator who’s experience is in an education system that has failed our students, teachers and parents. As the parent of a 2-year-old and a 3-year-old, my children will attend public school so I am committed to the future success of public education and not the blame for its past failures.

My opponent has signed a pledge to co-sponsor a constitutional amendment that would ban abortion without exceptions for rape or incest. She supports the banning of emergency contraception for victims of rape and incest. She has also pledged to support legislation banning Living Wills and Advanced Directives. When it comes to private health care issues and end of life choices, I believe government should stay out of your uterus, out of your hospital rooms and especially out of your death beds.

My opponent was hand-picked by the same political machine that has delivered politicians like Don Balfour, Shirley Lassiter, Charles Bannister and Kevin Kenerly. My opponent’s husband is a member of the Lawrenceville City Council which potentially conflicts with the interests of residents located elsewhere in District 101. The interests of downtown Lawrenceville often do not reflect the interests of citizens outside the downtown area, nor the interests of all residents of House District 101. Recently, my opponent pushed through legislation that changed city council terms in Lawrenceville from two years to four years. This benefits her husband, not her constituents. It’s time for a state representative who will actually represent the people of HD 101.

District 105

The candidates in this race each have experience running a small business, and each point to job creation as their top goal, if elected. But neither candidate has political experience.

Republican Joyce Chandler, a retired educator, said an improved education system in the state would help improve the local economy.

“It seems impossible, in my opinion, to separate the need for strengthening education for all of Georgia’s children and the need for strengthening our economic situation,” Chandler said. “While recognizing that parents are the ones to determine the most appropriate way to educate their children, public education, which serves most children and young people in our state, must provide quality education for all involved.”

Democrat Renita Hamilton said her experience working for a private investment firm, and a family-owned small business would help in budget practices.

“I embrace all constituents from any socioeconomic and culturally diverse background,” Hamilton said, “Which provides me with the ability of listening to and learning from diverse communities. My ability to relate to local residents while reaching across the aisle to legislators of any party will work to keep our tax base low, stimulate entrepreneurship, and industry for all Gwinnettians.”

Hamilton beat Rashid Malik in the July primary, while Chandler advanced past Damon Ladd-Thomas.

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Joyce Chandler

Joyce Chandler

Party: Republican

Age: 72

Education: Doctorate degree in counseling from the University of Georgia; master’s degree in counseling from Auburn University; bachelor’s degree in English and social studies from Samford University

Occupation: Retired educator, small business owner and executive director of a state nonprofit organization

Political Experience: None

Family: Husband Martin; daughters Kelle Chandler Ray, 46, Lesle Chandler Allen, 44; eight grandchildren

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

My faith governs my values, morals and political philosophy and will be the driving force in my role as representative. I believe that Godly principles should be evidenced at all times by our elected officials. If elected, I promise that I will consistently uphold these principles and will actively pursue that more and more transparency is evidenced at the state capitol. I promise to represent the people of District 105 with integrity and honesty.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

As the grandmother of eight and as one who has a heart for all children, I am especially concerned about the future of our state. It seems impossible, in my opinion, to separate the need for strengthening education for all of Georgia’s children and the need for strengthening our economic situation. While recognizing that parents are the ones to determine the most appropriate way to educate their children, public education, which serves most children and young people in our state, must provide quality education for all involved. With improved economic situations in our state, we will be better able to provide full funding for public education while also providing relief for parents who choose to educate their children through other venues than public education. In public education, pupil-teacher ratios must be reduced.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

I am the only candidate in the State House District 105 race who has experience in working in education, in beginning and managing a small business, and in leading the efforts of a nonprofit organization. My 36 years of experience in working in the education field and in keeping a nonprofit organization alive during these difficult financial times make me uniquely qualified to serve. As owner of a small consulting business, I understand the budgeting process and the necessity for living within one’s budget and, also, know how to listen and learn from others. I am certainly not a skilled politician, but my experience as a trained mediator results in my knowing how to gather all the facts, consider all possible options and make an appropriate decision while considering all the variables. I know how to research an issue and determine any underlying aspects. My commitment is unique to District 105, and I have no other political aspirations than serving as the representative of the people of our district. I am the only candidate in the District 105 race who is endorsed by Georgia Right to Life and who supports traditional marriage. Throughout my career, I have been in serving professions; and I desire now to serve my community as a State Representative. My life and career experiences and my values make me well qualified to serve.

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Renita Hamilton

Renita Hamilton

Party: Democrat

Age: 37

Education: Bachelor’s degree in communications; master’s degree in strategic leadership

Occupation: Small business owner

Political Experience: None

Family: Son, Kaleb, 14

What is your political philosophy and how will it drive your role in office?

My political philosophy is I believe in human rights. The inalienable fundamental rights to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being. This will drive my role as state representative for District 105 because I will support and advocate for the will of the people and not special interests or narrow views. I believe in being flexible to work with all people. Gwinnett County is a diverse county and having representation that is reflective of our community is important.

Name your top goal or issue you want to tackle.

The top goal or issue I want to tackle is job creation, education, child support reform and small business initiatives. Jobs can be created through education, training and programs that help Gwinnettians obtain the skills needed to excel in the industry of choice. Education support through finding ways to put budget cuts back into the Hope scholarship, teacher pay raises, and adequate resources for all children in Gwinnett. Child support reform to toughen up on delinquency to help single mothers take care of their children. Small business initiatives plans that promote the consumer experience while offering attractive marketing plans. Small business training classes to assist entrepreneurs with contract negotiations, healthy financial goal models, and budgeting practices.

What sets you apart from your competitor?

The qualities, assets, and benefits that set me apart from my competitor are reflected in my knowledge of the issues, experience and the fact I am a solutions person; that is why I am highly qualified and capable to serve. I bring a fresh approach, innovative ideas, and vibrant solutions that are based in real facts relevant to today. My business and professional experience gained while working for a private investment firm and family owned small business taught me smart budgeting practices necessary for organizations and companies to thrive in tough economic times. I embrace all constituents from any socioeconomic and culturally diverse background; which provides me with the ability of listening to and learning from diverse communities. My ability to relate to local residents while reaching across the aisle to legislators of any party will work to keep our tax base low, stimulate entrepreneurship, and industry for all Gwinnettians. With my energy level, including my ability to make tough decisions I will serve honorably for many years to come.

Comments

HonestIngine 1 year, 5 months ago

Timnothy Swiney, I do not know you but I wish you a lot of luck... Way to answer the questions with thought, knowledge, and intelligence. Did not know Clark's spouse was on L'ville City Council. You are correct more corruption... Interesting to know how these apparant educators, all voted to reduce the HOPE Scholarships last year under the direction of Deal's command. Rice, Clark. all of them.. Now look how enrollment at the Universities has fallen, and how our children are not being able to go to college. Deal will kill the HOPE Scholarship program, while helping his corupt friends.

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