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Simon no longer owner of Gwinnett Place Mall

Gwinnett Place Mall is one of the three major indoor malls in the county. If trends continue residents will have more choses in outdoor malls that are targeted for the communities.

Gwinnett Place Mall is one of the three major indoor malls in the county. If trends continue residents will have more choses in outdoor malls that are targeted for the communities.

DULUTH -- Retail property giant Simon has bailed on Gwinnett Place Mall, a move some local officials called "a unique, positive opportunity for development and revitalization."

In a quarterly statement released last month, Simon -- which also owns Gwinnett's Discover Mills and the Mall of Georgia -- announced that it had "disposed of its interests" in Gwinnett Place, which has struggled in recent years to compete with its two local counterparts.

Few other details were immediately available Thursday. A corporate spokesman for Simon did not return requests for comment.

The Gwinnett Place Community Improvement District and Executive Director Joe Allen, however, weighed in with a lengthy statement. Before Allen spoke of opportunity, he blamed Simon for the mall's decline.

"Those of us in this part of metro Atlanta and Gwinnett County have witnessed during the past several years how Simon Property Group's corporate decisions have ultimately led to the current state of the mall," his statement said.

Allen said the CID had planned for "this and other possible scenarios." He cited great location, excellent infrastructure, sought-after demographics and a large consumer base as reasons why the mall can still succeed.

"The Gwinnett Place CID is encouraged about the potential for continued success at the mall," Allen said. "This announcement is a unique, positive opportunity for redevelopment and revitalization focused on this strategically important asset in our community."

Comments

kevin 2 years, 1 month ago

The article falls short of tlling us who now owns the Mall. Please print when you get all the facts for us to read.

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jjbod1 2 years, 1 month ago

Oh, I can tell you who bought it. Lets just say before the year ends, Gwinnett Place Mall signs will no longer be in English, they will be in Korean. That entire area as we once all knew it is long gone. So sad! Between what has happened along pleasant hill road the past several years with all the anti American stores and shops, and the fact that the Duluth police do nothing but terrorize people. The local government cant figure out why no one wants to shop in the area any more.

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DavidBrown 2 years, 1 month ago

"...all the anti American stores and shops"??? That sounds rather xenophobic,

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Buck11 2 years, 1 month ago

"anti American stores and shops"??? That's such a ridiculous statement!

As far as what happened there...the urban sprawl moved on up 85 and took a lot of the sought-after consumers with it. As lower income consumers moved into the area, businesses that were there chased the money up 85 leaving a lot of empty storefronts around Pleasant Hill. Businesses that cater to the new residents of the area moved in.

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NewsReader 2 years, 1 month ago

You say "so sad", but seriously, what is the issue with the Koreans owning it? Where I've driven by with Asian signage along the roadway, it looks like some pretty nice upstanding facilities. I haven't ventured in there quite frankly because I don't even know where to begin interpreting the businesses they run there. But it appears to me that these people have become good stewards of their community. Am I missing something that you are seeing? It certainly looks as though they do a much better job than their predecessors.

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BurritoJones 2 years, 1 month ago

I agree with NewsReader. That area of Duluth has done little but gone downhill over the last 20 years. Every time a neighborhood gets bought up by the Korean community they seem to clean it up and make it a healthy place of business. Just because their signs aren't in English is hardly any detriment to me.

Besides, I fully encourage you to go into one of their businesses. I think you'll be pleased.

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OrganicGrl 2 years, 1 month ago

<p>@BurritoJones...I am for one has been to one of the Korean's location but guess what I didn't understand anything they said.. This person in particular didn't speak English. They are covered on that main stretch and I think it is pathetic with the Korean language . I don't mind them having stores but dang don't you think it is a little segregated that all of us on here don't even know what we are shopping for if you cant read signs.

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

The only thing that is segregated is the resistance of some people to try anything new or different. I realize it can be intimidating to walk into a business with a sign in a foreign language, but try it, you might be pleasantly surprised. As far as you "not minding them having stores", it's not really up to you or anyone else who can own and operate a store as America is a free country. I can tell you from experience, that one store on Pleasant Hill, Assi, has my business from now on. One trip inside was all I needed. Yes, I can't understand some of the packaging or products, but I do understand being able to buy fresh produce, seafood and meats for prices that are cheaper than shopping at Walmart. Clean stores, fast friendly service and you'd be surprised at how many of your neighbors are already shopping there. You are really missing out if you don't at least take a look.

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jack 2 years, 1 month ago

The last time I walked into a business with a sign in a foreign language, I spent 18 months in a Honduran prison. I honestly thought it was a pet shop.

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R 2 years, 1 month ago

Unless the signage is subtitled in English whats the point?

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dentaldawg83 2 years, 1 month ago

Does the "Community Investment District" concept do anything but suck up and waste taxpayer dollars?

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

The CID is funded 100% by the businesses in that area. The CID has done more for the Gwinnett Place Mall area than any other entity, including our government. They have paid for traffic improvements, new sidewalks, new landscaping, extra security and have put in place requirements for the appearance of new structures. Next on tap, they have been successful in pushing for the rebuilding of the bridge over I-85 to further ease traffic congestion.

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NewsReader 2 years, 1 month ago

"The CID is funded 100% by the businesses in that area." WRONG! A CID (Community Improvement District) aka (Tax Allocation District) siphons away money in the form of property taxes that would otherwise be utilized for education. Remember that little GEM that the Dumb Masses of Georgia voted for as a constitutional amendment about five years ago? "Next on tap, they have been successful in pushing for the rebuilding of the bridge over I-85 for further ease traffic congestion." WRONG AGAIN! The "Diverging Diamond Interchange" has been in the works for some time for both Jimmy Carter Boulevard exit and Pleasant Hill exit. This had a lot to do with improving traffic congestion and little to nothing to do with Commnunity Improvement Districts. And BTW, the intersections are changing, not the bridges. They just rebuilt that bridge recently did they not?

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

Sorry News Reader, although there is a tax allocation district in Gwinnett Place, the money is collected by the county and used for improvements in the area. The CID supports itself and its projects through additional "self-taxes" agreed upon by the business members of the CID. If you go to the CID website, you will see that yes, the diverging diamond interchange has been proposed for some time now, by the CID. The improvements to the Jimmy Carter bridge were also proposed years ago by the Gwinnett Village CID. http://www.gwinnettplacecid.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=130&Itemid=66 The Gwinnett Place CID funded the studies on the rebuilding of the Pleasant Hill interchange bridge and proposed a short-term fix in the form of the diverging diamond. I have lived in the Gwinnett Place area for eight years now and I haven't seen any improvements to the Pleasant Hill Rd. interchange since I've been here. I do know that the CID named that as their number one priority years ago.

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mikebyrd1984 2 years, 1 month ago

LilburnLady, You are correct in all your points. NewsReader obviously needs to do a little more homework and possibly read the news to be better informed. He is way off base on his ignorant comments. A TAD is a financing tool that is called tax increment financing in other states. It has been very successful in other areas of the nation and Georgia to redevelop locations. Gwinnett Place was designated a TAD a couple of years ago and the TAD will be an important incentive to attract new owners to redevelop the mall. Again you are correct that the CID is funded by the commercial property owners. It is controlled by the area property owners that organized and worked to create the CID. I know as one of my best friends is a property owner. I understand that the Gwinnett Place CID made the Diverging Diamond Interchange their number 1 priority a couple of years ago. It would not be happening if the CID had not been there to put in the initial funds and handle the initial studies to justify its construction to the DOT and Feds. I have heard it should be under construction later this spring/early summer. I have lived in Gwinnett all my life (40 years) and the Pleasant Hill Road bridge has not been rebuilt since it was constructed in the early 1980s. LilburnLady, glad you are informed and enlightened. We need more folks like you in Gwinnett.

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mikebyrd1984 2 years, 1 month ago

You need to visit their Web site, www.gwinnettplacecid.com, and see how the investments of the commercial property owners that formed the CID have improved the area and the projects that are soon to go on-line. My best friend is one of those property owners and he keeps me in the loop on all that they are doing from the bridge project that will begin construction in the summer to crime being reduced thanks to the CID's security patrols to their landscaping efforts.

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news2me 2 years, 1 month ago

"Allen said the CID had planned for "this and other possible scenarios." He cited great location, excellent infrastructure, sought-after demographics and a large consumer base as reasons why the mall can still succeed"

The sought-after demographics will not go to the Gwinnett Place CID, the writing is on the wall for the area to become even more isolated.

Let's be honest, the immigrants that have taken over that area don't want us over there. I have tried, but never felt welcomed or encourage to come back. They have self segregated and created a community that for the most part excludes anyone that looks like them. Like I just posted in regards to the GCPS shortfall, Gwinnett is quickly becoming the next Dekalb.

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Mack711 2 years, 1 month ago

This area has had an identity problem for years. You must speak at least 2 other languages to shop at this mall. Many are calling Duluth, Seoul Korea East. It is a shame that they can not use English to communicate with the local residents that have been here for generations. As for the Duluth Police mentioned by jjbod1 you are correct. Since they got their radar permits back that is about all you see the Duluth PD doing around there.

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

When is the last time you have actually been to Gwinnett Place Mall? Belk, J.C.Penney's, Sears and Macy's are still there and doing well. Aeropostale, Forever 21, Victoria's Secret, etc., etc., are all still there. Last time I was in there (a couple of weeks ago), noone working inside the mall had any difficulty understanding me nor did I have difficulty understanding them. So what if Koreans, Vietnamese, Chinese, Mexican and Japanese people have opened businesses in the area? Would you rather have empty storefronts? They are property owners, they pay taxes and they contribute to our economy. That's more than I can say for the people and businesses who chose to pull up stakes and leave the area for greener pastures further north. The "sought-after demographics" are minorities and in particular, Asians because they have money to spend. Gwinnett is now majority minorities so why would any business owner want to market to only one sector of the population?

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Mack711 2 years, 1 month ago

We were there last week only because of JCP and Sears. Those are the only 2 stores worth going into for our family. You need to travel outside the US and see how you are treated in other countries when you do not speak the native language. When you get away from the 'tourist areas' and the ones that only want your US$. then you will find out what we are talking about. Having been in places where we as Americans are not wanted you will think about things much differently We welcome all to come but at least have enough respect to learn our ways and attemp to speak our language.

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

"We welcome all to come but at least have enough respect to learn our ways and attemp to speak our language." So, when you travel outside the U.S., did you feel the need to "attempt to speak their language?"

Yes, it is extremely difficult to live somewhere you are "not wanted". I've been there and it makes life difficult. That's why I admire those immigrants who still come to America (legally) knowing that there are many Americans are distrustful, resentful and who do not want them here.

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B3 2 years, 1 month ago

Simons will still be managing the property. The Ownership rolls from Simons to the company/bank that was servicing the loan.

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Sthrnldy 2 years, 1 month ago

I have no reason to go to that area and shop. I might go to an Asian market once in a blue moon to purchase something different, but this is not where I would ever do the bulk of my shopping. There is nothing xenophobic about not having the need to shop there. Most Americans have no need to go there on a regular basis, period.

There is no more melting pot. Gwinnett Place looks like the people that have taken over the area. Everybody does in fact self segregate into their own comfort zone through culture, race and class or wealth.

Gwinnett Place as we knew it is gone.

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ACC12_SEC13Booster 2 years, 1 month ago

Of course the Gwinnett Place as we all knew it is gone...gone to Hwy 20 between the junctions of I-985 and I-85.

The Mall of Georgia became the hot new shopping mall when it opened up only 15 years after Gwinnett Place opened up taking Gwinnett Place's "mojo" along with it, which is what happens when two newer shopping malls open up between five and fifteen miles farther out.

Gwinnett Place was the older, more established mall so when Discover Mills and the Mall of Georgia opened up Gwinnett Place instantly became the "abandoned mall" creating an opening for the immigrant community to move in with all of the emptying storefronts, big-box stores and rents lowered dramatically by property owners desperately looking to get someone, anyone to move in to those suddenly not-very-hot locations.

Gwinnett Place isn't the victim of "segregation", Gwinnett Place is the victim of leapfrogging overdevelopment at the behest of a developer and spectulator-driven culture within county politics and county government. That type of leapfrogging overdevelopment and the subsequent ethnic changes that result happens outside of every major city and Metro Atlanta as a very major metro area of six million people and home to the World's Busiest Airport is no different and even more prone to overdevelopment and ethnic changes in many cases as developers and spectulators have exceptional pull within the political scene here and the beyond busy international airport make it more than super-easy to get here, especially from places around the globe like the aforementioned Seoul, South Korea and the like.

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ACC12_SEC13Booster 2 years, 1 month ago

The Mall of Georgia area is not immune from a possible Gwinnett Place-style decline either as developers are already scouting sites farther out I-85 near the Braselton-Hoschton areas (near the Hwy 211 and Hwy 53 junctions) for new mega retail, commercial and residential developments.

As hot as the Buford/Mall of Georgia area seems now, it could easily be in a situation similar to that of Gwinnett Place in a few short years.

Part of living in a very major metropolitan area is the fluidity of which a given geographical area can change, sometimes very quickly.

When Gwinnett Place opened in 1984, it instantly became the hottest retail area in Northeast Metro Atlanta and stayed hot for about 15 years until the Mall of Georgia and Discover Mills opened around the same time.

No matter how seemingly hot a retail district may seem, NO mall and surrounding area can recover from the double-whammy of two newer malls opening up in such a short period of time.

No matter what is done, Gwinnett Place will never be what it once was with the Mall of Georgia and other high-income shopping areas like the Forum on Peachtree and the Hwy 124/Snellville shopping areas sucking up all of the revenue from higher-end and upscale shoppers that Gwinnett Place used to cater to alone when there was no competition, not-to-mention the possibility of even newer development going up farther out I-85 in Braselton in an area that is seemingly semi-rural at present.

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Sthrnldy 2 years, 1 month ago

As soon as the economy bets better and the RE market in Gwinnett rebounds, the money and taxbase will definitely be gone in Gwinnett.

I can't tell you the number of people that are waiting out to sell and get out of Gwinnett. Lets be honest, being a majority minority country is not diverse.

IMO, Gwinnett Place is safer than Discover Mills. I detest Discover Mills compared to the other Mills centers on the east coast. Sawgrass, Potomac and Concord but Discover to shame. For now though, Mall of Georgia can't be beat. You are right, that too will change!

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minorgirl 2 years ago

God bless your hateful heart.

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

"Most Americans have no need to go there on a regular basis, period." So Asians are not Americans? Not everybody self segregates Sthrnldy, only those who have a fear of anything different and are afraid to venture out of their comfort zones. Those people will never be comfortable in an environment that is new and different. However, there are a LOT of us who WELCOME something new and different and look forward to experiences outside our "comfort zone" as that is how you grow in life.

Besides, everywhere you look in Gwinnett, there are businesses and homes owned by minorities. My neighborhood is a microcosm of nationalities. I have neighbors from Vietnam, Mexico, Cuba and Australia, just on my own block. They keep their homes and yards up, send their children to public schools and we all know each other as neighbors. So to say we "self-segregate" is nonsense in Gwinnett.

Yes, Gwinnett Place as you knew it is gone, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. The traffic problems have been alleviated, the area looks better now than it ever did and the business owners are now more invested in the community around them than ever before. The only thing certain in life is that things will change. You can either embrace the change or resist it, but the change will still come. I will continue to shop in the area as I always have because the stores there have products that I need and want. I go to Frye's Electronics at least three times a month because they have the best selection and best prices for computer equipment. I buy clothes at Sears and J.C. Penneys because I like their selection and prices. I could care less what nationality the salesperson is, only that I am getting the best value for my dollar.

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Sthrnldy 2 years, 1 month ago

Bless your heart, how often do you pat yourself on the back? Sorry, but you have created a fantasy to deal with the reality your living in. Good for you that your neighborhood looks like the UN, but most neighborhhoods don't look that diverse and you know it! I have lived in the same neighborhood for over 14 years and yes it has changed. We have several wonderful Indian and Asian families that have moved in over the years. These families moved to my neck of Gwinnett for top notch schools and high quality homes, not to become my BFF and sing kumbaya. Our education levels and income ranges are appx. the same. That is the class / wealth portion of my post that you failed to acknowledge.

I stated that I have gone to the GP area on occasion, so sorry to burst your bubble that I have no problems getting out of my comfort zone. I still frequent JCB much to the disapproval of my husband. Like most people if I want to visit Korea, I would go to Seoul, not the Gwinnett Place CID. I don't pretend I am surrounded by a bunch of cultures and countries when I go to Epcot either.

What are you going to do when Sears and JCP close up shop? Can you handle that change when it comes in the near future?

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

Sorry that you and your neighbors do not socialize or spend time together as friends and neighbors. I have no control over who moves into or out of my neighborhood, but I do have control over the fact that I can welcome them and try to include them in neighborhood activities and show them what our area has to offer. I guess I do live in a fantasy world as I am not willing to have a cynical, negative view of this area. I have never wanted to live in an area that is majority one nationality and one economic level (boring). I don't know where you live, but I have yet to see a neighborhood in the Gwinnett Place area that is not diverse. Those people who didn't like the demographic changes have moved or will move in the future, but there are plenty of us that don't feel threatened by it and don't see it as a negative or leading to some sort of irreversible decline. You have your opinion and I have mine and mine is optimistic for the future.

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Sthrnldy 2 years, 1 month ago

Again, what are you going to do when (not if) those national chain stores you mentioned close?

You act as if my neighbors were told they could move only one street in my neighborhood and we have excluded them from any reindeer games! :) That is not the case, we socialize, but less often as we used to. Kids get older and life gets busy. This is all change that I have gotten used to and accepted. We will move when the RE market rebounds AND we don't need this big of a home, not because our hood becomes too diverse.

I don't live anywhere near Gwinnett Place. We never have wanted to live that close to shopping meccas for property value reasons. You either have a situation that occurs like Perimeter or Gwinnett, there is no in between.

Call me boring, but financial security is what drives me to live where I live and spend money as I see fit. Most people feel and live where they can because of economics, not because they are searching for the most diverse area. Most folks that openly seek out racial and culture diversity in reality are looking for the polar opposite. Their comfort zone is to live amognst those that look like them. You are an optimist, but I am a realist. Tis life!

Enjoy the lovely weekend!

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

"Again, what are you going to do when (not if) those national chain stores you mentioned close?"

Who says they are going to close? I do live near Gwinnett Place and have for close to 10 years now. I've seen the changes, some good and some bad, however, overall, I love the area. The close proximity to shopping is a huge plus for me. The bottom line is that people choose where to live for a wide variety of reasons. My problem is with people who think they speak for me or my area when they don't even live here or know the people that do live and work here. Your perception of the area is that (as you have stated) "most Americans have no need to there on a regular basis". Really? Have you done a poll to see how many people who shop there are "Americans"? I am an American as are a lot of the minorities in the area who are now second and third generation Americans. You and the other people in the area who need to live in an area where "most people look like them" don't speak for me and never will. I would rather live in a cardboard shack than live in a monochromatic world and it gives me the creeps to think that there are people who still think that way. You enjoy your weekend too and your reality or whatever you call it.

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Sthrnldy 2 years, 1 month ago

LilburnLady, your panties are certainly in a wad this afternoon! You need to deal with the REALITY of how your beloved Gwinnett Place is viewed by the majority of citizens. Bets are any of your original neighbors that are left don't share your viewpoint and are kicking themselves they didn't leave long ago. They may not tell you that to your face, but that is how many of them most likely feel. There are "creeps" all around you. Deal with that, but stop coming back here and shooting the messenger!

LilburnLady, you are the extreme exception, not the majority that rules!

I will most certainly enjoy my weekend, but without your rose colored glasses!

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

Honey, My panties always seem to get in a wad when I encounter people who assume (as you did in your previous post) that if you are of a different national origin, you are not an "American" and that because caucasians are no longer the majority in Gwinnett, that means the county is no longer fit to live in. Yes, I do have some of those creeps still living around me and I feel for them. They are negative, cynical, anxious people and I hope they are able to flee soon for their own benefit.

I don't intend to be the extreme exception as you say and I would rather light a candle and share light with others rather than go around snuffing out the candles of others. You usually get burned that way. Peace, love and understanding to you my dear and I sincerely hope that you are able to make your escape soon.

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B3 2 years, 1 month ago

Simon will still manage the property. The loan was defaulted on and the bank that serviced the loan know owns the property. It was not sold.

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JohnPDunn 2 years, 1 month ago

This is the best thing to happen to the mall and to the area. Simon has demonstrated that it can run a mall in a booming location, but clearly is unequipped to deal with changing economic trends. I hope the CID can move forward with whatever its contingencies are. There was an excellent plant for redeveloping the mall a few years back but it was shot down by the district county commissioner at the time. If the CID, the county, the business owners, and yes, our Asian neighbors work together, Gwinnett Place will rise from the ashes far and away in a better state than it has been in at least a decade.

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NewsReader 2 years, 1 month ago

Hey LiburnLady, if Gwinnett Place is such the grand place to live that you make it out to be, then why did it become necessary for it to be "revitalized" under the guise of a Community Improvement District? And if someone doesn’t want to try anything new or different, that’s not a problem. It’s a prerogative. Spare us the lecture on fear and intolerance. If it’s outside of their comfort zone, then that’s really none of your business. It’s their business, and they don’t owe you an explanation. The fact is, the people spending the money have left the building. Otherwise, it wouldn’t have experienced the decline that it did in much the same way the area in and around Jimmy Carter Boulevard. We understand that it is in your comfort zone. You moved there 10 years ago by your own admission. In other words, you have absolutely no idea what it once was compared to what it is today. Do you know what was there before Gwinnett Place Mall? I’ll give you a hint: It would have been a very suitable living arrangement for you. You would have fit right in. I have one last thing to say about this area. I welcome the Koreans, for it is them that have taken ownership and responsibility, and are cleaning up that dump. The difference between these foreigners and those entitlement driven, irresponsible, hypocritical predecessors is that as a foreigner, they have a much clearer fundamental understanding and appreciation of what it means to live in a capitalistic land of opportunity that they could not possibly have dreamed of in their own country. They are living the American dream because they really want it instead of thinking they have a right to it.

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LilburnLady 2 years, 1 month ago

I blame mostly the Gwinnett County Commissioners for the reason the area needed to be revitalized. During the property "boom", the Commissioners rubber-stamped every rezoning request for a strip mall that came down the pike. The result was an oversupply of commercial space that will take years to fill and the devaluing of the commercial space already in Gwinnett County. Add to that, a traffic nightmare in the Gwinnett Place area that was spawned by a DOT using antiquated guidelines for routing traffic through commercial areas (they basically set up the streets as if it were a huge subdivision with dead ends and non-connecting streets) and you have a recipe for the decline of the area.

All I know is that whatever the past was, it's gone now and we are not going to every get it back. All we can do know is to push forward and embrace a new vision for the area. I have to say, I'm not the only one that's stepping out of my comfort zone. Went to Assi today to pick up stuff for dinner (strawberries are .99 for a quart y'all) and noted that everytime I go in there, there are more and more caucasians, african-americans and just generaly, that it is a melting pot. Everybody eats and everybody likes a bargain and people are discovering that there are good things in that area for almost everyone. It may have been the pits before, but it's not now and things are looking up. All of the empty restaurants and store fronts on Pleasant Hill are now filled and that means economically, the area is turning around. You can like it or not like it, but that's just reality and personally, I'm glad and I sincerely hope that others can come to our area and experience it as well.

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news2me 2 years, 1 month ago

LilburnLady is understandably upset. She sees her community in dire straits and the future is not bright for Gwinnett Place. If you read the comments about the issue on the GCP Facebook page you do get the sense of how many citizens feel about the area.

Many citizens are not anti-immigrant. Gwinnett has seen an invasion. Diversity does not exist in an that area where it is largely Korean and Asian. That is not diverse. LilburnLady needs to get out of her comfort zone and visit other parts of the country. The problem is that most immigrants and illegals are highly concentrated in certain areas which is segregating themselves. While the Korean and Asian community may be maintaining the area for now the future of that area does not look good.

Try as you like but you will never convince people that our country is headed in the right direction with our current immigration policy.

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kevin 2 years, 1 month ago

Demolish it all and replace it with a racetrack. People feel uncomfortable buying all that imported cheap trash and the look and feel of that area. Just look at the nationality of the business culture in that area and you will see why.

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nicholson 2 years, 1 month ago

Kevin, do you think the Korean and Asian businesses are the only ones that import the "cheap trash" as you call it? You obviously have not been in a Wal-mart, Target, Marshalls, etc, because many of the items in the American retail stores are all imported from China.

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Ashley 2 years, 1 month ago

I remember when Gwinnett Place kicked out Chick-fil-A and McDonald's b/c they were beneath the mall. When MACYS opened up that was the big turning point. They choose poorly.

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Daculan 2 years, 1 month ago

Wow - so much vitriolic hatred in these posts. Gwinnett Place is not what it used to be. I remember when it first opened it was nice. What happened was NOT Koreans moving in though. Don't you all remember the thuggin' gang crap. All the Moms said - no way and started going to Mall of Ga. I drive 45 minutes to go to Duluth though for Korean BBQ - glad to do it. Wouldn't step foot in that Mall though. Discover is now just about as bad. You don't want to be there off hours either I can tell you. I'm not much of a Mall shopper, but I like to hit Mall of Ga every once in a while. Its about safety people. Make an area safe and people will go. Make it dangerous and they go elsewhere. As far as I can see that particular area of Duluth has seen its worst times and is re-emerging. People do live in cultural centers where they can share their experience. It just so happens that part of Duluth is very Korean. I can tell you as the only white people usually eating Korean BBQ - they are thrilled to see us there and thrilled to have us enjoy their culture. We feel safe and its fun. If they want the area and can revitalize it to their purpose where others have failed or decided not to go anymore then power to them. The Koreans take Duluth. The thugs take Discover. The rest will go to Mall of Ga. Simon is not the villian though. They know what they are doing. They'll be pulling out of Discover Mills next. Agree it was a bank takeover - not a sale.

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maryamshakura 2 years, 1 month ago

Honestly, I think all Gwinnett Place needs is a movie theater again.

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cp3 2 years, 1 month ago

It amazes me to see the comments from Mack711 and a few others that talk like they are citizens of Duluth. The Gwinnett Place Mall area is not in the City of Duluth. Duluth Police do not patrol that area. Duluth does not receive any property tax from that area. Bashing the City for those things show how mis-informed you are. I think if this area was controlled by Duluth, a much better job would have been done.

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Mack711 2 years, 1 month ago

I do live in Duluth. Refer to this article and you will see why there are so many comments posted. http://www.gwinnettdailypost.com/news... This article where the Mayor and council commented on this property. So therfore they opened the door for comments by myself and others.Since the Mall is not in Duluth as you say then why did they comment on this issue? Probably because some of the business that goes to this mall also goes into Duluth. Thanks for your comment.

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Don 2 years ago

I was told by one of the CID members about this four weeks aggo. It seems that Simon defaulted on the loan!! Removing it from its portfolio is bit of an untrue statement, removed would have been a better term.

They are worried about who may purchase the mall at a fire sale for pennies on the dollar.

I really do not care who owns it as long as they try to keep the value up and bring soem good tenants in.

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R 2 years ago

Discover Mall should be next ...

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