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Dodging rain, Mullins returns for downtown concert

Staff Photo: John Bohn Shawn Mullins sings and plays his Gibson SJ-200 guitar while performing at the "Moonlight and Music" series held on downtown Lawrenceville Square Friday evening.

Staff Photo: John Bohn Shawn Mullins sings and plays his Gibson SJ-200 guitar while performing at the "Moonlight and Music" series held on downtown Lawrenceville Square Friday evening.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Ashley Tullis, of Buford, holds her five-year old son Seth as her daughter Sadie, 4, dances to the live music of Shawn Mullins at the "Moonlight and Music" series held on downtown Lawrenceville Square Friday evening. Seated next to his mother is Sean Tullis, 8.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Shawn Mullins performs at the "Moonlight and Music" series held on downtown Lawrenceville Square Friday evening.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- With ominous clouds and the memory of last year's cancelled show looming overhead, Shawn Mullins opened Friday night's concert on Lawrenceville's square with eight defiant words.

"We're not gonna get rained out," he said. "I'm determined."

Mullins, an Atlanta-area native most noted for his 1998 No. 1-single "Lullaby," took to the stage half an hour ahead of the scheduled 8 p.m. start time in a successful attempt to dodge the rain. Donning a gray scally cap, navy v-neck T-shirt and jeans, Mullins played under the gazebo on the lawn of Lawrenceville's Historic Courthouse.

Hundreds packed the surrounding lawn in lawn chairs and on blankets.

The exact number was a little sketchy, but it was at least the fifth time Mullins has played during Lawrenceville's "Music and Moonlight" outdoor concert series (excluding last year's rained-out show). Lawrenceville Tourism and Trade Association spokeswoman Jenny Savoy said it's all about giving the people what they want.

"We listen to what Lawrenceville tells us, who they like, and that's who we bring back," Savoy said. "And Shawn Mullins is somebody they want back every year."

A couple of food trucks and downtown restaurants kept concert-goers full and thirst-free. Attendance was free but tables were also available for a small fee.

"We sold all tables out two months ago," Savoy said. "We added 10 more and sold them out, too."