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SEC NOTES: Saban: 'Bama vets know traps of trying to repeat

Alabama coach Nick Saban signs autographs at the Southeastern Conference NCAA college football media days in Hoover, Ala. on Thursday, July 19, 2012. (AP Photo/The Birmingham News, Linda Stelter) MAGS OUT

Alabama coach Nick Saban signs autographs at the Southeastern Conference NCAA college football media days in Hoover, Ala. on Thursday, July 19, 2012. (AP Photo/The Birmingham News, Linda Stelter) MAGS OUT

HOOVER, Ala. -- Nick Saban says some of Alabama's veterans can use past experiences of trying to repeat as national champions to avoid missteps.

He notes that players who were on both the 2009 and 2011 title teams know the potential pitfalls and what made them successful.

Alabama fans and players view the 10-3 record in 2010 as a disappointment given the program's expectations. Tight end Michael Williams says this team saw "what complacency did to us." This year's team is predicted by media attending Southeastern Conference media days to finish second in the Western Division behind LSU.

Saban says it's hard to carry momentum from one year to the next because you lose a quarter of your team. He says this squad seems less affected by past success than the 2010 team.

Tennessee tired of talk, wants action in year 3

HOOVER, Ala. -- Tennessee coach Derek Dooley wants "a little less conversation" about turning around his football program and more action.

The third-year coach said Thursday at the Southeastern Conference media days that he feels "better about our program than at any other time I've been in Knoxville."

The Volunteers have an 11-14 record over the past two seasons, including a 4-12 mark in the SEC. Dooley says that should improve thanks to a stabilized roster, a healthy quarterback and 17 returning starters.

Junior Tyler Bray was one of the SEC's best passers before injuries limited him to seven games. He threw for 1,983 yards and 17 touchdowns.

Ole Miss' Freeze has daunting rebuilding job

HOOVER, Ala. -- Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze says he's a realist.

That's a good thing with his situation at Ole Miss, which has a lot of work to do before the Rebels can become a consistent threat in the Southeastern Conference.

The first-year coach took a strange road to his first SEC job, working as a high school coach for more than a decade before rebuilding programs at NAIA-level Lambuth (Tenn.) and Arkansas State. Now he's in a conference that's won the last six national championships.

Freeze says "our program is in a spot that none of us are happy with," and he's "very anxious about starting the process" of returning the Rebels to winning ways.

Ole Miss has lost 15 of its last 16 conference games and was 2-10 last season.