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Opossum takes ride on NYC subway

In this undated photo, an opossum hides under a seat on the subway in New York.   Startled riders abroad a Manhattan-bound train spotted the opossum around 4:30 a.m. last Friday.  The New York Times  reports that finding the nocturnal creature on a subway train was rare in several ways. Opossum tend to like trees and they are not burrowers although they sometimes go below ground in search of food or warmth. After the animal bared its teeth at officers who tried to remove it with heavy gloves, animal control experts were called.  NYC Transit spokesman Charles Seaton said it was the first anybody could remember seeing a wild animal in the system. (AP Photo/New York Times)  MANDATORY CREDIT;  NYC OUT,  MAGS OUT; NO SALES; TV OUT;  NO ARCHIVE

In this undated photo, an opossum hides under a seat on the subway in New York. Startled riders abroad a Manhattan-bound train spotted the opossum around 4:30 a.m. last Friday. The New York Times reports that finding the nocturnal creature on a subway train was rare in several ways. Opossum tend to like trees and they are not burrowers although they sometimes go below ground in search of food or warmth. After the animal bared its teeth at officers who tried to remove it with heavy gloves, animal control experts were called. NYC Transit spokesman Charles Seaton said it was the first anybody could remember seeing a wild animal in the system. (AP Photo/New York Times) MANDATORY CREDIT; NYC OUT, MAGS OUT; NO SALES; TV OUT; NO ARCHIVE

NEW YORK -- A suspicious passenger of the four-legged variety led to the evacuation of a New York City subway car.

Startled riders aboard a Manhattan-bound train spotted an opossum curled up underneath a seat near the train's heating duct about 4:30 a.m. on Friday.

It was reported that the animal apparently boarded the train at Coney Island in Brooklyn, where the platform is above ground. The subway car was evacuated several stops later in Manhattan as officers wearing heavy gloves tried to remove it. When the marsupial bared its teeth at them, animal control experts were called in.

Rats and pigeons are often seen in the city's subways, but NYC Transit spokesman Charles Seaton said it's the first time anybody could remember a wild animal in the system.