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Girl, 8, calls 911 and saves mom's life

Staff Photo: John Bohn 8-year old Lexi Lambes saved her mom's life by calling 911, against her mother's wishes, when she washaving heart problems. Michelle Robison, Lexi's mom, ended up being rushed to the hospital, in need of a pacemaker.

Staff Photo: John Bohn 8-year old Lexi Lambes saved her mom's life by calling 911, against her mother's wishes, when she washaving heart problems. Michelle Robison, Lexi's mom, ended up being rushed to the hospital, in need of a pacemaker.

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Staff Photo: John Bohn Michelle Robison kisses her 8-year old Lexi Lambes, who saved her mom's life by calling 911, against her mother's wishes, when she was having heart problems. Michelle Robison ended up being rushed to the hospital, in need of a pacemaker.

NORCROSS -- Sometimes, kids, even your parents don't know what's best for themselves. Just ask Lexi Lambes.

Lexi -- an 8-year-old who lives in Michigan with her father most of the year -- was at her mother's Norcross home for the summer when, on July 25, she became a hero by ignoring her mother's wishes. It was a decision that Michelle Robison admits probably saved her life.

"If it wasn't for her calling 911," Robison, now recovering after having a pacemaker put in, said this week, "I don't know what would have happened."

What would have happened is likely something grim.

On that day, Robison thought she was simply continuing her battle with a severe sinus infection. She was tired, dizzy and her "whole head hurt." She finally felt so bad that she broke down and started crying, and Lexi, whose grandmother is a 911 dispatcher, told her mom she was "calling the hospital."

"I said, 'Lexi, you can't call the hospital, they're not going to do anything for a sinus infection,'" Robison said. "I didn't think it was worth calling 911, but she saw something more."

After a short back-and-forth, she called.

Intelligently, the soon-to-be fourth-grader told the 911 dispatcher the situation and that her mother, who was born with a heart condition that sometimes leads to fluttering, had had cardiac issues in the past.

"I told them that my mommy had a heart problem and that she was feeling bad and she felt like she was going to pass out and she has a severe sinus infection," Lexi said this week, without pausing to take a breath.

By the time an ambulance got Robison to Gwinnett Medical Center's Duluth campus, her heart rate was an astoundingly low 24 beats per minute. She was going into heart failure.

Thanks to her daughter's quick actions, she was stabilized before being transferred to Emory Medical Center in Atlanta. Robison now has a pacemaker, and is recovering back home -- where, until Aug. 19, she has Lexi as a helper.

The duo went to church last week, and Lexi got a well-deserved hero's welcome.

"It was pretty fun," she said, "because everybody's like, 'You saved your mom, you're a lifesaver, you saved your mom, you're a hero.'"

And all of it happened because she just didn't listen.

"I'm like mom, sometimes kids have to disobey their parents for good things," Lexi said.