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Suwanee woman finds massage therapy a rewarding field

Staff Photo: Keith Farner
 Massage therapist Karen Krotz, who owns her own business and has worked in the field for 16 years, enjoys helping people feel better.

Staff Photo: Keith Farner Massage therapist Karen Krotz, who owns her own business and has worked in the field for 16 years, enjoys helping people feel better.

-- Open since: 2003

-- Owner: Karen Krotz

-- Hours: Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

-- Phone: 770-271-7155

-- Website: karenkrotz.comSUWANEE -- We live hard, work hard and play hard. That's why Karen Krotz believes massages are important.

Krotz, who has worked as a massage therapist for 16 years, owns her massage business. While she worked as a chiropractic assistant, Krotz took prerequisite classes for nursing school. But after she visited an open house at the Atlanta School of Massage, she set off on a new career path.

"I knew that's where I should be," she said. "It just felt like home."

A year of night school later, while Krotz worked as a part-time massage therapist at the chiropractor's office, she transitioned to her own business. She's worked out of her home since 2003.

Most clients visit once a month, Krotz said, but she also has clients who overdo yard work, or come in at the change of seasons while moving boxes. But she's had some clients for 15 years.

"They've had their choice of tons of other massage therapists, and they chose me," she said.

At the first session, Krotz asks for the client's goal and if they have lingering issues. And she suggests other way to relieve stress or muscle tightness like stretching, meditation or yoga.

Because she's nationally certified, Krotz studies the latest techniques and trends in the industry, such as hot stones.

As opposed to her chiropractic work, Krotz' clients now may come for more specific treatment like a hot stone massage, or reflexology, which is working on hands and feet. A chiropractor would focus on neck or back pain, a specific area rather than technique, Krotz said.

As her practice evolves, Krotz said she could focus more on cancer therapy and geriatric modalities. Eventually, Krotz said she may transition away from doing a deep tissue massage.

But overall, she does it for the satisfaction of her client's post-massage reaction.

"I love the fact that when people open that door and come back out to the waiting room, they go, 'Ahh, I feel so much better,'" Krotz said. "It's extremely rewarding to be able to help people to feel better."