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Locals flock to post office for tax deadline

Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan David Alexander of Lawrenceville has his 2011 and 2010 tax returns stamped by window clerk Tam Nguyen at the United States Postal Service at the North Metro Facility in Duluth on Tax Day, Tuesday.

Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan David Alexander of Lawrenceville has his 2011 and 2010 tax returns stamped by window clerk Tam Nguyen at the United States Postal Service at the North Metro Facility in Duluth on Tax Day, Tuesday.

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Tax Day Deadline

Residents scramble to get their taxes postmarked on April 17, 2012.

Residents scramble to get their taxes postmarked on April 17, 2012.

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Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan Phyllis Moseley of Suwanee hands her 2011 tax return to mail handler Angela Dawson at the United States Postal Service at the North Metro Facility in Duluth on Tuesday. The North Metro Facility provided curb side service until 12:05 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

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Staff Photo: Brendan Sullivan US Postal Service mail handlers Gwendolyn Sanders, left, and Angela Dawson, collect and stamp tax returns at the United States Postal Service at the North Metro Facility in Duluth on Tax Day, Tuesday. The North Metro Facility provided curb side service until 12:05 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

DULUTH -- Some simply thrive in the 11th hour.

Folks like Stephen Mendez of Gwinnett County find their minds function at peak levels in the final moments of a deadline.

"It's how I operate," said Mendez, who arrived Tuesday at the North Metro Post Office on Boggs Road. "I can't do stuff ahead of time like everybody else. I'm not wired that way."

He and other procrastinating personality types mailed their taxes in on Tuesday -- the final day to file the documents without being penalized.

With April 15 falling on a Sunday and Monday being an obscure holiday in Washington, D.C., taxpayers were given two extra days to file taxes this year.

With the IRS having received 99 million tax returns up to this point, most taxpayers have already filed according to the agency's records.

But then there are those few who would rather finish the job in the nick of time.

Like Kimberly Pierce, who offered up a theory on the nature of those like herself who waited until Tuesday.

"The tendency is to keep your money as long as you can," Pierce said. "Nobody likes to give away their hard-earned money."

Those filing their taxes on Tuesday like Pierce weren't the only ones who showed up at the Post Office on Boggs Road. A group of Gwinnett County residents planned to gather and protest Tuesday afternoon about the current tax system, which they feel benefits corporations and the very wealthy.

"Millions of Americans are struggling every day to find a job and keep a roof over their head, yet Wall Street and the top 1 percent are getting record bonuses, earning record profits and still refusing to pay their fair share," said Glenda Poindexter, an event organizer.

Another protester, Eva Russo, said the group planned to mobilize in order to "express our outrage that the rich and corporations have been allowed to play by different sets of rules than the rest of us and aren't paying their fair share to rebuild the economy."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.