0

4-H Teaches Children At Gwinnett County Fair

Larry Little and his grandson Ben Taylor, 5, play the Top Spin water gun race at the Gwinnett County Fair Friday in Lawrenceville.
 Jeremiah and Amantha Hill (CQ) push their children Micah and Yarah at the Gwinnett County Fair Friday in Lawrenceville. The Gwinnett County Fair runs through September 25th.
 Adah Elizabeth Cate, front, along with Marco Nava, left center, Juan Nava, right center, and Emely Nava, rear, ride the Wacky Worm ride at the Gwinnett County Fair Friday in Lawrenceville. 

Larry Little and his grandson Ben Taylor, 5, play the Top Spin water gun race at the Gwinnett County Fair Friday in Lawrenceville. Jeremiah and Amantha Hill (CQ) push their children Micah and Yarah at the Gwinnett County Fair Friday in Lawrenceville. The Gwinnett County Fair runs through September 25th. Adah Elizabeth Cate, front, along with Marco Nava, left center, Juan Nava, right center, and Emely Nava, rear, ride the Wacky Worm ride at the Gwinnett County Fair Friday in Lawrenceville. 

LAWRENCEVILLE -- The Gwinnett County Fair draws a comfortable crowd for 11 days with most seeking thrills, fried food and a good time. While walking around the fairgrounds, visitors who find themselves near the merry-go-round will spot a quaint barn with a larger-than-life brown cow standing outside.

Take a peek inside to find the local Georgia 4-H group with baby animals and interactive stations. Volunteers dressed in the green 4-H aprons educate everyone -- especially children -- who walk through the double doors.

"A lot of these kids are from areas where they don't know anything about farm animals," volunteer Tim Daly said. "They get an appreciation from where there food comes from ... it doesn't just come from a Super Walmart."

For one dollar, people can walk through the barn to learn about a variety of farm animals, including baby chicks, calves, sheep, goats, rabbits, ducklings, pigs and a donkey named Ellie Mae.

On this day last year, the yearling donkey was born at the 4-H petting zoo during the annual County Fair between 2 and 3 p.m. when the workers were away from the area. She is back to celebrate her big day with the public and show off how much she has grown in a year.

Besides Ellie Mae, there are other reasons to visit the barn. There is a milking station for children to learn how to milk a cow. It's not only hands-on, it's educational.

"To be able to share this with kids -- especially those who many not have the experience around animals -- I think it's a really good thing," said volunteer Amy Baker, who has been involved with 4-H since she was in middle school.

A majority of the volunteers are children themselves. Baker's young sixth-grade daughter was also in the barn, showing other children the baby ducks.

"I think 4-H provides so many wonderful skills," Baker said. "There are great opportunities for social and leadership development."