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Experts discuss the age of wireless at Gwinnett Tech

Staff Photo: Frank Reddy Experts on the wireless industry spoke during a forum Tuesday at Gwinnett Technical College's Busbee Center. From left, are Maury Margol, Rick Rigsbee, Terence Caston and Steve Brumer.

Staff Photo: Frank Reddy Experts on the wireless industry spoke during a forum Tuesday at Gwinnett Technical College's Busbee Center. From left, are Maury Margol, Rick Rigsbee, Terence Caston and Steve Brumer.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- The dynamic nature of the wireless age cannot be understated, according to a panel of experts who visited Gwinnett County Tuesday morning.

Sponsored by Partnership Gwinnett and Gwinnett Chamber Economic Development, the final phase in a series of the Gwinnett Technology forum included four veterans of the wireless technology field.

Steve Brumer, a partner with a global wireless consulting firm, told the audience of more than 100 that "the trends of the wireless industry continue to change on a daily basis."

"Within the next five years, "Brumer said, "you'll be able to expand your wireless use at home, in your car, everywhere you go."

Terence Caston, a sales engineer with T-Mobile USA, said the speed at which the wireless industry has changed is "almost unfathomable."

As the industry continues to move forward with such speed, Caston warned consumers to "not get caught up in the acronyms."

"There's 3Gs, 4Gs, LTEs and so forth," Caston said. "As good consumers, we should ask the question, how am I going to use that product? Good consumers should be able to be wary of the hype."

Motorola Channel Account Manager Rick Rigsbee talked about how some of the latest in wireless technologies are also being used in government and public safety.

He said many people don't realize the wireless opportunities already being realized in the government sector.

"There are school districts in Texas that have wireless on their school buses," Rigsbee said. "Children can watch educational content on their way to and from school."

Also speaking Tuesday was Maury Margol, co-founder and past president of the Wireless Technology Forum, a not-for-profit organization with more than 650 members.

He said that Americans should be proud of the wireless age.

"For the first time we've surpassed the world in the amounts of data being sent wireless," Margol said. "We are now ahead ... and we can be proud that the U.S. and Canada are ahead of the world in wireless."