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THE DISH: Grayson Olde Post Cafe

Grayson Olde Post Cafe serves, from bottom left clockwise, cornbread, roast beef with mushroom au jus, mashed potatoes, broccoli salad, dinner biscuits, turkey with cornbread dressing, creamed corn, green beans and cranberry sauce.

Grayson Olde Post Cafe serves, from bottom left clockwise, cornbread, roast beef with mushroom au jus, mashed potatoes, broccoli salad, dinner biscuits, turkey with cornbread dressing, creamed corn, green beans and cranberry sauce.

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Grayson Olde Post Cafe has eight tables with a comfortable country atmosphere.

ON THE MENU

• Grayson’s large breakfast — Three eggs, three sausage patties or four pieces of bacon, grits, hashbrown patty and gravy biscuit, $9

• Three blueberry pancakes, $6

• Chicken salad sandwich — All white meat served on a croissant roll with lettuce, tomato and provolone cheese, $7

• Meatloaf with mushroom gravy — Served with two vegetables and either a corn muffin or biscuit. Only served on Wednesdays, $7

Map

Grayson Olde Post Cafe

Grayson Olde Post Cafe

420 Grayson Parkway, Grayson

678-395-5056

www.oldepostcafe.com

Open since: September 2009

Location: At the intersection of Grayson Highway and Grayson Parkway, across from Walgreen's

Hours: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays, closed Sundays

Owners: Kathy and John Closek

Atmosphere: The Olde Post Cafe is a small, quaint restaurant with a mom and pop atmosphere. There are eight tables, self-serve drink area and a counter to order food. All of the cuisine is served on Styrofoam plates with plastic silverware. When guests are finished, they clean up the space they occupied by tossing out the used plates.

"I wanted a small town cafe where people could gather and communicate with each other," owner Kathy Closek said. "We learn our customers by name."

Every morning, Closek and the two women who work in the kitchen with her arrive at the cafe by 6:30 a.m. to prep, bake and cook the meals chosen for the day.

The doors open at 7 a.m. for breakfast. By 11:15 a.m., the kitchen is serving up lunch items, which change every day.

"Some of our customers just bang on the back door and we let them in for breakfast," Closek said of early bird eaters.

Customers order food from the counter and grab a spot in the dining room. One of the women from the kitchen brings the meal out to the table.

Menu: In the kitchen, Closek and her team make everything by hand and there is absolutely nothing served out of a can.

"I hate canned food," she said. "Why would I serve that when it's easy to make fresh food?"

The lunch menu changes daily, rotating favorites like chicken and dumplings, fried fish and fried chicken. Even the vegetables are swapped out depending on what fresh produce is received. And if any food is left over, it's offered again the next day until it is gone.

The cafe's signature treat is Kathy's homemade cinnamon rolls. It takes her hours to prepare the gooey sweets, but she knows it's well worth it.

"I don't make them daily because it takes awhile," she said. "When I do make them, they are eaten up fast."

She combines all the ingredients by hand, lets the dough proof and shapes the circular rolls. While the batches are backing, Closek whips together the sugary frosting to spread on top of the hot pastries.

Another tasty dessert made at the cafe is cobbler -- mixed berry, sweet potato or cherry. Closek never makes apple cobbler because "no one eats it."

"We love (working here) because it's fun, but we love it even more when we don't have any food left because (the guests) ate it all up," she said.

Things you might not know: Kathy also runs a corporate catering business under the same name as the restaurant. She became a chef on her spare time by taking numerous cooking classes over the years while working at her health care position at Emory University.