0

Challengers eat and run in Norcross 5K

Photo: Andrew McMurtrie<br> Lisa Windsor eats her first doughnut at the Krispy Kreme For a Cure 5K Race on Saturday.  Proceeds from the race go toward the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life.

Photo: Andrew McMurtrie
Lisa Windsor eats her first doughnut at the Krispy Kreme For a Cure 5K Race on Saturday. Proceeds from the race go toward the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life.

NORCROSS -- Nearly 100 people participated in a 5K race in Norcross on Saturday with a unique twist.

The challenge was this: Halfway through the 3.1-mile race, eat a half-dozen Krispy Kreme doughnuts and finish the course in fewer than 45 minutes.

"A couple (people) got sick on us," said Scott Myers, Norcross' assistant boys basketball coach.

The Krispy Kreme For a Cure 5K race was organized by the high school team as a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society's Relay For Life. It was also a way for the team to be involved in a community service project, Myers said.

The race was modeled after the Krispy Kreme Challenge, an annual charity event at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C. The challenge was created by a few undergraduate students as a dare, who ran two miles from the campus bell tower to the Krispy Kreme store, where they each ate a dozen doughnuts, and then ran back to the bell tower.

The North Carolina event has grown from 150 runners in 1006 to 6,000 runners in 2010.

In Gwinnett's event, runners could choose to take the challenge of eating six doughnuts halfway through the race or participate just as a competitor. Some relay teams also participated, with one member running the first half of the race, one eating the doughnuts and another running the last half.

Myers said they stocked the halfway point with 300 half-dozen boxes of doughnuts. Challengers who could not finish the box and competitors who wanted to eat theirs later could take the doughnuts home. Race winners received a box of a dozen doughnuts.

Myers said he wants the race to become an annual event.

"It's something unique," he said. "It would be a big event."


If you are having problems viewing this slide show, click here