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Girl wins $15,000 in upgrades for her school

Special Photo Carolyn Phung, a fourth grade student at Jenkins Elementary, is congratulated by Principal Dot Schoeller, center, for her artwork. Phung won a national award this week in a contest sponsored by McGraw-Hill Education, a provider of education materials and resources. Her school was awarded $15,000 in technology upgrades for the student's accolades. Her family, also pictured, arrived for Monday's celebration.

Special Photo Carolyn Phung, a fourth grade student at Jenkins Elementary, is congratulated by Principal Dot Schoeller, center, for her artwork. Phung won a national award this week in a contest sponsored by McGraw-Hill Education, a provider of education materials and resources. Her school was awarded $15,000 in technology upgrades for the student's accolades. Her family, also pictured, arrived for Monday's celebration.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- A talented young artist and math enthusiast from Jenkins Elementary school has made her school very proud.

Friends and fellow students in Carolyn Phung's gifted class are grateful as well. Because of the national award she won for illustrating with art what math means to her, the school will receive a $15,000 award that includes technology upgrades for the classroom.

Last month, Phung was named as a finalist in a national contest sponsored by McGraw-Hill Education, a provider of education materials and resources. On Monday, she was announced as one of 12 national winners in the competition. Her work was selected from among 2,400 other entries based on votes by judges and the general public.

Phung's teacher, Kristi Rico, said the experience "breathed life into the local education arena and allowed us to commend a student for a job well done."

Principal Dot Schoeller said Phung is a "phenomenal student in our gifted program. She's a straight A student and has also worked through learning English as a second language, a very intelligent young girl."

Representatives with McGraw-Hill agreed.

"The passion, creativity and love of math displayed in Carolyn's entry captures the spirit of the contest," said Lisa O'Masta, vice president. "It is our hope that this passion for math will extend beyond the contest and is contagious in classrooms across the country, promoting an interactive learning environment for these important fields of study.

To view Phung's winning selection, entitled "Invertebrate Art," visit mymath.shycast.com/submission/show/1917. Phung's art will be featured on the print and digital editions of McGraw-Hill's newest elementary math program.

According to its website, the McGraw-Hill My Math art contest is designed to "inspire students' passion for math and other science, technology, engineering and math fields."