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Peacocks roam Lawrenceville neighborhood

Dottie Blais of Bentbrooke Trail in Lawrenceville snapped a photo of these birds earlier this month. The peacocks were spotted often over the summer, said husband Roger Blais.

Dottie Blais of Bentbrooke Trail in Lawrenceville snapped a photo of these birds earlier this month. The peacocks were spotted often over the summer, said husband Roger Blais.

LAWRENCEVILLE -- Why did the peacock cross the road?

Bentbrooke Trail resident Roger Blais is curious himself.

Over the past several months, the Blais family has spotted a couple of colorful birds strutting the streets. Roger's wife, Dottie Blais, ventured close enough earlier this month for a photo of the fowls.

Unfortunately, when it came to displaying their famous, iridescent feathers the animals were a bit camera shy.

But the peacocks weren't too shy to roost on a neighbor's roof, Roger Blais said

"Who knew peacocks could fly?" asked Blais. "These birds are just amazing. I don't know where in the world they came from."

They don't come from Georgia originally, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Melissa Cummings with the wildlife resources division of DNR said the animals are not native, but could have flown the coup somewhere close.

"They're probably escapees from somebody," Cummings said.

In June another peacock was spotted in Lilburn, having escaped from the Yellow River Game Ranch, a nearby farm where several peacocks roam.

Codi Reeves, manager at the ranch, said the business gets about two or three calls a year regarding Indian Blue Peacocks -- the type seen on Bentbrooke Trail.

Said Reeves: "People call and say: 'Your peacocks are in my backyard.'

But there's no missing birds at Yellow River Ranch, he said.

Reeves did offer some insight into why people sometimes spot the birds in Georgia and why they're still around.

"People years ago bought them as a showpiece on farms," he said. "It's kind of a hobby bird. Folks like the way they look, because of their feathers."

Weighing as much as 15 pounds, the male bird is most well known for its array of blue-green plumage. The female peahen has a mixture of dull green or brown in its feathers.

Out in the wild, Reeves said the animals "can do pretty good."

"They mostly eat small insects like grasshoppers," he said. "They would be able to find food pretty easy here on their own."

Reeves said peacocks are no more dangerous than a chicken or a rooster, but will sometimes make some noise.

"They yell out," Reeves said. "It almost sounds like a lady yelling 'help.'"

Blais said the birds are not an unwelcome sight at the neighborhood.

"It's very interesting," he said. "It's not the kind of thing you see every day."

Comments

dnolivier 2 years, 11 months ago

Those are my peacocks! I own Azalea Stables off of Highway 20.

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