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LETTERS: Don’t wreck our economy with green incentives

Nate McCullough (“Easier to cast blame than find solution to global warming,” Aug. 26, 8A) is correct that the world is getting warmer, people do play a part in that warming and carbon emissions are bad for us. However his solution, providing incentives to corporations (whom he regularly sees as evil entities) is actually part of the reason our economy stinks.

The ultimate incentive for any corporation is quit buying its product, so the solution rests with us, the consumers, not politicians creating loopholes. Government incentives distort the free market and absolve consumers of their responsibilities to each other.

— Patrick Malone,

Blairsville

Comments

Jan 2 years, 7 months ago

Patrick, I must agree that loopholes need to be curtailed; however, we could easily finance green incentives by eliminating non-green incentives, such as corporate jets and deductions for "business conventions" that are vacations for top executives in disguise. If we can help make the investment in private wind generation and solar panels worthwhile to corporations, then we are reducing pollution for generations as well as creating much needed jobs in the private sector. But incentives are not limited to loopholes. We should have stricter regulations so corporations pay for their pollution. I do not agree with "cap and trade". I believe it should have caps with increasing restrictions over time, but fines for putting higher amounts of pollution into our air. It would give every industry an incentive to improve. If we would extend emission standards required for cars to trucks and SUV's we would see a significant decease in air borne pollution. The much maligned Jimmy Carter administration put into effect a strict mpg standards timetable. If Reagan's administration had not overturned them, we would have less greenhouse gases in our air today.

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jack 2 years, 7 months ago

Hefty fines and more onerous regulations to coerce businesses to comply with a green policy would more likely result in shutdowns, bankruptcies, or relocations overseas. Let's look at the example of Evergreen Solar, a Massachusetts company highly touted as a creator of green jobs. They opened in the summer of 2008, received $43 million in taxpayer-funded stimulus, and by Jan 2011 were laying off 800 employees to move to China. They filed for bankruptcy this month. So yeah, let's further restrict the competitive marketplace in favor of even more government control.

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Jan 2 years, 7 months ago

Let me clarify my position. I am not in favor of cash layouts to companies involved in creating wind and solar but giving tax incentives to companies to convert more of their power needs to solar and wind. This will create an increase in demand in these green technologies thus encouraging private expansion in these areas. Any grants of money should be limited to research into more efficient energy collection, distribution and storage. Create the market and industry will fill in the gaps. PS, clever avatar!

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