0

NATON IN BRIEF: Boat crash victims remembered in Pa.

The Associated Press. A student from Hungary places a flower in front of the display of photos of Szabolcs Prem, left, and Dora Schwendtner, at a memorial service Saturday in Philadelphia. The two students from Hungary died in a collision between a tourist boat and a barge on Wednesday on the Delaware River.

The Associated Press. A student from Hungary places a flower in front of the display of photos of Szabolcs Prem, left, and Dora Schwendtner, at a memorial service Saturday in Philadelphia. The two students from Hungary died in a collision between a tourist boat and a barge on Wednesday on the Delaware River.

PHILADELPHIA -- Friends silently and solemnly dropped white roses into the Delaware River on Saturday in memory of the two Hungarian students who died when the amphibious tourist boat they were riding was struck by a barge and sank.

City officials, religious leaders and Hungarian diplomats joined a group of grieving Hungarian exchange students at a memorial service dedicated to 20-year-old Szabolcs Prem and 16-year-old Dora Schwendtner, who drowned after the duck boat capsized Wednesday.

''The loss of a young life, of two young lives, is almost impossible to understand and almost impossible to accept,'' said Bela Szombati, the Hungarian ambassador to the United States. ''We stand with you, we stand with the children, the young people.''

At the end of the ceremony, wreaths and flowers were dropped into the river and a pair of doves were released.

BP: Cap removed, oil flows freely

NEW ORLEANS -- Robotic submarines removed the cap from the gushing well in the Gulf of Mexico on Saturday, beginning a period of at least two days when oil will flow freely into the sea.

It's the first step in placing a tighter dome that is supposed to funnel more oil to collection ships on the surface a mile above. If all goes according to plan, the tandem of the tighter cap and the surface ships could keep all the oil from polluting the fragile Gulf as soon as Monday.

BP spokesman Mark Proegler said the old cap was removed at 1:37 p.m. Saturday.

The oil is flowing mostly unabated into the water for about 48 hours -- long enough for as much as 5 million gallons to gush out -- until the new cap is installed.

Seventh lawsuit filed over Ariz. immigration law

PHOENIX -- A seventh challenge filed to block enforcement of Arizona's tough new immigration is the first legal objection to training materials designed to teach police officers how to enforce the law.

The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court, said the training materials are ''so vague and ill-defined that they will certainly lead to widespread racial profiling and discrimination.''

Among the materials is a video released July 1 that warns officers not to use race or ethnicity when enforcing the new law, but tells them they're allowed to consider whether a person speaks poor English, looks nervous or is traveling in an overcrowded vehicle.

Obama: More help for stressed vets

WASHINGTON -- The government is taking what President Barack Obama calls ''a long overdue step'' to aid veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, making it easier for them receive federal benefits.

The changes that Veteran Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki will announce Monday fulfill ''a solemn responsibility to provide our veterans and wounded warriors with the care and benefits they've earned when they come home,'' Obama said in his weekly radio and online address Saturday.

NOAA: Gulf seafood safe

APALACHICOLA, Fla. -- Shrimp, grouper, tuna and other seafood snatched from the fringes of the oil in the Gulf of Mexico are safe to eat, according to a federal agency inspecting the catch.

To date, roughly 400 samples of commonly consumed species caught mostly in open waters -- and some from closed areas -- have been chemically tested by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Officials said none so far has shown concerning levels of contaminants. Each sample represents multiple fish of the same species.

NOAA and the Food and Drug Administration began catching seafood species in the Gulf within days of the April 20 BP rig explosion off Louisiana that generated a massive oil spill.

Cash-hungry LA schools seek movie shoots

LOS ANGELES -- In an era of yawning budget deficits and teacher layoffs, schools in the Los Angeles area are looking at a nontraditional source for some extra cash -- Hollywood.

School districts from Lawndale to Glendale are seeking to earn thousands of dollars a day from renting their campuses as locations for movies, TV shows, commercials and even truck parking.

The money is being used to save teachers' jobs, upgrade school facilities and replenish districts' dwindling funds.