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NATION IN BRIEF: Man charged with getting al-Qaida training

The Associated Press. In this courtroom sketch, Assistant U.S. Attorney James Loonam, left, is seen with defense attorney Robert Gottlieb, center, and Gottlieb's client, defendant Adis Medunjanin, during Medunjanin's arraignment at the federal courthouse in New York City on Saturday.

The Associated Press. In this courtroom sketch, Assistant U.S. Attorney James Loonam, left, is seen with defense attorney Robert Gottlieb, center, and Gottlieb's client, defendant Adis Medunjanin, during Medunjanin's arraignment at the federal courthouse in New York City on Saturday.

Man charged with getting al-Qaida training

NEW YORK -- A New York City man under investigation for his links to a terror suspect pleaded not guilty Saturday to charges that he flew to Pakistan to get military training from al-Qaida.

Adis Medunjanin entered the plea during a swift arraignment at a federal court in Brooklyn. He faces counts of receiving military training from a foreign terrorist organization and conspiracy to commit murder in a foreign country.

The 25-year-old was one of two Queens men arrested early Friday in connection with the investigation of Najibullah Zazi, a Colorado airport driver who pleaded not guilty last year to supporting terrorism.

Hawaii can't afford special election

HONOLULU -- Cash-strapped Hawaii can't afford to pay for an election to replace a congressman who is planning to step down next month to run for governor, potentially leaving 600,000 urban Honolulu residents without representation in Washington.

Budget cuts have left the state Office of Elections with about $5,000 to last until July, with a special election costing nearly $1 million, interim Chief Elections Officer Scott Nago said.

Until the state finds money or this fall's regularly scheduled elections occur, one of Hawaii's two seats in the House of Representatives will remain vacant.

Friends: Suspect meant no harm at Newark airport

PISCATAWAY, N.J. -- Friends described the man charged with breaching security at Newark Liberty International Airport as a romantic who just wanted to see his girlfriend off properly.

Speaking outside Haisong Jiang's home near the Rutgers University campus in Piscataway on Saturday, Ning Huang said he's known the 28-year-old for several years. Huang says Jiang's ''a very good person'' who didn't realize the ramifications of his actions on Sunday.

Andy Riu, who also described himself as a friend of Jiang, called him ''very romantic.'' Both men said Jiang had been dating the woman for about a year and that he had flown to California several times to visit her.

Detroit paper won't resume printing

ROYAL OAK, Mich. -- A new Detroit-area newspaper that suspended operations after less than a week says it won't resume publication as planned.

In a statement Saturday, Detroit Daily Press co-publisher Mark Stern blamed ''circulation issues'' for the paper's failure to publish again. The paper had said it planned to resume publication after Jan. 1.

The statement said suspension of publication will be permanent ''for now.''

The paper hit the streets Nov. 23 but said on its Facebook page on Nov. 27 there had been a lack of advertising, sales and distribution.

Publishers Mark and Gary Stern said they created the newspaper to provide seven-day-a-week home delivery after The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press reduced home delivery to three days a week.

Police: Ex-NYPD commissioner in hit and run

NEW YORK -- A former New York City police commissioner has been accused of backing his SUV into a pregnant woman, then driving away.

Police say Howard Safir bumped the woman with his Cadillac Friday afternoon in Manhattan.

She was treated for a bruised shoulder, but wasn't seriously hurt.

Police detectives decided not to press charges.

They say Safir didn't know he'd hit someone.

The victim tells a different story.

Joanne Valarezo tells The New York Times that both she and a passenger in the SUV yelled at the driver for being careless before he drove away.

Obama accepts Reid apology for racial remark

WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama says he's accepted an apology from the Senate's top Democrat for calling him a ''light-skinned'' African-American ''with no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one.''

Obama, the first black president, said in a statement on Saturday that he accepted the apology for the ''unfortunate comment." Obama said he knows what's in Sen. Harry Reid's heart and says the Nevada Democrat has shown ''passionate leadership'' on issues of social justice.

A book set to be released on Monday quotes Reid as saying in private discussions that the country was ready to put a black in the White House, especially one like Obama. The racially tinged comments prompted Reid to issue a public apology for the comments earlier on Saturday.