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Cryer, Collette among stars at Emmy after-parties

LOS ANGELES - Grammy-winning R&B diva Mary J. Blige summed up the Emmy after-parties during a soulful, sassy performance complete with a glittering golden microphone.

"Don't forget how important we are. ... We are all in this together, whether we like it or not!" Blige shouted at the "Entertainment Tonight" and People magazine party.

Blige was talking about life, but she could have been talking about the crowd, with everyone from "Mad Men" actresses January Jones and Christina Hendricks to Jon Cryer of "Two and a Half Men" bopping in unison to the thumping music.

Lit up by votive candles and orange dangling lamps, converted cathedral Vibiana in downtown Los Angeles was an elegant destination after the 61st Annual Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday. Celebrities also attended several other parties around town.

Cryer, clutching his trophy for best supporting actor in a comedy series, was all smiles as he escorted his wife, Lisa Joyner. The first-time Emmy winner planned to have French toast and hang out with his son before heading to work Monday.

The couple wouldn't stay long at the bash, but not without some good hard partying first, he joked.

"That's the great thing about having a driver," Cryer said with a laugh. "We're going to get wasted in an incredibly short period of time. Give us 20 minutes here, and we're moving on, wasted! We're just going to say, 'pull over,' barf, and keep going."

Guests included another first-time Emmy winner, Toni Collette, holding her trophy for best lead actress in a comedy series for "United States of Tara," plus Julie Benz of "Dexter," David Boreanaz of "Bones" and starlets from "Melrose Place" and "90210."

"My trick is to try to snub people that are more famous than I, because it messes with their head," cracked "My Life on the D List" comedian Kathy Griffin about her party etiquette. "So for me to snub, like someone from 'Mad Men,' they get this look on their face, like, 'Wait, no, no, no, I'm snubbing YOU!' ... It's a little mind game I play. It's called high school, and I apparently never graduated."

Guests dined on globally inspired dishes catered by chef Susan Feniger's Hollywood restaurant STREET, including Korean dumplings filled with kimchi and Ukrainian dumplings stuffed with spinach, zucchini and cheese.

Emmy host Neil Patrick Harris made a grand entrance, clapping to Blige's tunes and mugging for pictures.

The Governors Ball was the first stop for many guests, where a room at the Los Angeles Convention Center had been transformed into an oasis. Red, purple and green lanterns punctuated black fabric dotted with tiny lights.

A jazz quartet performed on a rotating center stage, as partygoers munched on sweet peppers and eggplant caviar, filet mignon with polenta ravioli and chocolate-infused raspberry creme.

Rainn Wilson of "The Office" held his wife's hand as he congratulated Emmy winners, and Alec Baldwin toted his best acting Emmy for comedy "30 Rock" as he greeted well-wishers.

Across town, at HBO's lavish, packed party at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, "Mad Men" star Jon Hamm and his girlfriend Jennifer Westfeldt left at midnight to head to AMC's private party to honor the show, winner of the best drama Emmy for the second year in a row.

Hamm said he finally got to snag a drink and food at the Governor's Ball, and said the pair would "get sleep whenever we can" after the night's festivities.

HBO emerged a champ again this year, with a leading 21 trophies.

Cast members from the cable network's hit vampire show "True Blood," though shut out this year, laughed and mingled under the party's enormous tent, which was decorated with blood-red cushions and black vases bursting with red roses.

A chandelier dripping with ruby red crystals hung over guests, who sipped champagne and a vodka-cranberry juice drink called Vampire's Kiss. Food catered by Wolfgang Puck included hearts of palm, goat cheese panna cotta, asparagus with shaved truffle cheese and paella with chorizo.

Six drummers slammed along to a DJ who was spinning Michael Jackson and rock 'n' roll tunes.

Michael Emerson, carrying his best supporting actor trophy for ABC drama "Lost," was accompanied by his wife, "True Blood" actress Carrie Preston.

"We had sort of stopped wishing for it to happen tonight," he said. "But as soon as we stopped hoping for it, there it was. ... A person always wonders if they're really worthy of so much attention."

Debra Messing, dressed in a sparkling red Michael Kors gown and 5-inch heels, came with her husband, Daniel Zelman, creator of FX drama "Damages."

"My feet are killing me," Messing said. "I've been trying to figure out, strategize. How do I get to that chair to sit down?"

Winners in all categories for the 61st Annual Primetime Emmy Awards announced by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Complete list of winners at Sunday's 61st Annual Primetime Emmy Awards:

Drama Series: "Mad Men," AMC.

Comedy Series: "30 Rock," NBC.

Actor, Drama Series: Bryan Cranston, "Breaking Bad," AMC.

Actress, Drama Series: Glenn Close, "Damages," FX Networks.

Actor, Comedy Series: Alec Baldwin, "30 Rock," NBC.

Actress, Comedy Series: Toni Collette, "United States of Tara," Showtime.

Supporting Actor, Drama Series: Michael Emerson, "Lost," ABC.

Supporting Actress, Drama Series: Cherry Jones, "24," Fox.

Supporting Actor, Comedy Series: Jon Cryer, "Two and a Half Men," CBS.

Supporting Actress, Comedy Series: Kristin Chenoweth, "Pushing Daisies," ABC.

Miniseries: "Little Dorrit" PBS.

Made-for-TV Movie: "Grey Gardens," HBO.

Actor, Miniseries or Movie: Brendan Gleeson, "Into the Storm," HBO.

Actress, Miniseries or Movie: Jessica Lange, "Grey Gardens," HBO.

Supporting Actor, Miniseries or Movie: Ken Howard, "Grey Gardens," HBO.

Supporting Actress, Miniseries or Movie: Shohreh Aghdashloo, "House of Saddam," HBO.

Directing for a Comedy Series: "The Office: Stress Relief," Jeff Blitz, NBC.

Directing for a Drama Series: "ER: And in the End," Rod Holcomb, NBC.

Directing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Series: "American Idol: Show 833 (The Final Three)," Bruce Gowers, Fox.

Directing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special: "Little Dorrit: Part 1," Dearbhla Walsh, PBS.

Variety, Music, or Comedy Series: "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart," Comedy Central.

Reality-Competition Program: "The Amazing Race," CBS.

Writing for a Comedy Series: "30 Rock: Reunion," Matt Hubbard, NBC.

Writing for a Drama Series: "Mad Men: Meditations in an Emergency," Kater Gordon and Matthew Weiner, AMC.

Writing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Series: "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart," Comedy Central.

Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special: "Little Dorrit," Andrew Davies, PBS.

Host, Reality or Reality-Competition Program: Jeff Probst, "Survivor," CBS.

Original Music and Lyrics: "81st Annual Academy Awards: Song Title: Hugh Jackman Opening Number," ABC.

List of winners in the creative arts categories of the 61st annual Primetime Emmy Awards:

Guest Actor in a Comedy Series: Justin Timberlake, "Saturday Night Live," NBC.

Guest Actress in a Drama Series: Ellen Burstyn, "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: Swing," NBC.

Guest Actress in a Comedy Series: Tina Fey, "Saturday Night Live: Presidential Bash 2008," NBC.

Guest Actor in a Drama Series: Michael J. Fox, "Rescue Me: Sheila," FX Networks.

Governors Award: Sheila Nevins, HBO Documentary Films president.

Animated Program (for Programming One-Hour or More): "Destination Imagination (Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends)," Cartoon Network.

Animated Program (for Programming Less Than One Hour): "South Park: Margaritaville," Comedy Central.

Art Direction for a Multi-Camera Series: "How I Met Your Mother: Shelter Island, Not A Father's Day," CBS.

Art Direction for a Single-Camera Series: "Pushing Daisies: Dim Sum Lose Some," ABC.

Art Direction for a Miniseries or Movie: "Grey Gardens," HBO, and "Little Dorrit," PBS.

Art Direction for Variety, Music, or Nonfiction Programming: "American Idol: Episode 821-822," Fox, and "2008 MTV Video Music Awards," MTV.

Casting for a Comedy Series: "30 Rock," NBC.

Casting for a Drama Series: "True Blood," HBO.

Casting for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special: "Little Dorrit," PBS.

Choreography: "81st Annual Academy Awards: Musicals Are Back," ABC, and "So You Think You Can Dance: Adam and Eve/Silence," Fox.

Cinematography for a Half-Hour Series: "Californication: In Utero," Showtime.

Cinematography for a One-Hour Series: "The Tudors: Episode 303," Showtime.

Cinematography for a Miniseries or Movie: "Little Dorrit: Part 1," PBS.

Cinematography for Nonfiction Programming: "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations: Laos," Travel Channel.

Cinematography for Reality Programming: "Out of the Wild: The Alaska Experiment, What Did I Sign Up For?" Discovery Channel.

Commercial: "Heist," Coca-Cola.

Costumes for a Series: "Pushing Daisies: Bzzzzzzzzz!" ABC.

Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special: "Little Dorrit: Part 3," PBS.

Costumes for a variety/music program or a special: "So You Think You Can Dance: Episode 415-416A," Fox.

Directing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Special: "Beijing 2008 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony," Bucky Gunts, NBC.

Directing for Nonfiction Programming: "Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired," Marina Zenovich, HBO.

Main Title Design: "United States of Tara," Showtime.

Makeup for a Series, Miniseries, Movie or a Special (prosthetic): "Grey Gardens," HBO.

Makeup for a Single Camera Series (non-prosthetic): "Pushing Daisies: Dim Sum Lose Some," ABC.

Makeup for a Multi-Camera Series or Special (non-prosthetic): "MADtv: Episode 1405," Fox.

Makeup for a Miniseries or a Movie (non-prosthetic): "The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler (Hallmark Hall of Fame Presentation)," CBS.

Music Direction: "Streisand: The Concert," CBS.

Music Composition for a Series (Original Dramatic Score): "Legend of the Seeker: Prophecy," Syndicated.

Music Composition for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Original Dramatic Score): "Into the Storm," HBO.

Original Main Title Theme Music: "Great Performances," PBS.

Picture Editing for a Drama Series (Single-Camera): "Breaking Bad: ABQ," AMC.

Picture Editing for a Comedy Series (Single or Multi-Camera): "30 Rock: Apollo, Apollo," NBC.

Picture Editing for a Miniseries or Movie (Single-Camera): "Taking Chance," HBO.

Picture Editing (Short Form): "81st Annual Academy Awards," ABC, and "Stand Up to Cancer," ABC, CBS and NBC.

Picture Editing for a Special (Single or Multi-Camera): "Chris Rock: Kill the Messenger," HBO.

Picture Editing for Nonfiction Programming: "This American Life: John Smith," Showtime.

Picture Editing for Reality Programming: "Project Runway: Finale (Part 1)," Bravo.

Hairstyling for a Single-Camera Series: "Mad Men: The Gold Violin," AMC.

Hairstyling for a Multi-Camera Series or Special: "Dancing With the Stars: Episode 709," ABC.

Hairstyling for a Miniseries or a Movie: "Grey Gardens," HBO.

Creative Achievement in Interactive Media - Nonfiction: "The Late Night with Jimmy Fallon Digital Experience," NBC.com.

Creative Achievement in Interactive Media - Fiction: "The Dharma Initiative," DharmaWantsYou.com.

Lighting Direction (Electronic, Multi-Camera) for Variety, Music or Comedy Programming: "American Idol: Finale," Fox.

Variety, Music, or Comedy Special: "The Kennedy Center Honors," CBS.

Special Class Programs: "Beijing 2008 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony," NBC.

Special Class - Short-format Live-Action Entertainment Programs: "Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog," drhorrible.com.

Special Class - Short-format Nonfiction Programs: "Writer's Draft," Fox Movie Channel.

Children's Program: "Wizards of Waverly Place," Disney Channel.

Children's Nonfiction Program: "Grandpa, Do You Know Who I Am? With Maria Shriver," HBO, and "Nick News with Linda Ellerbee: Coming Home: When Parents Return from War," Nickelodeon.

Nonfiction Special: "102 Minutes That Changed America," History.

Nonfiction Series: "American Masters," PBS.

Reality Program: "Intervention," A&E.

Exceptional Merit in Nonfiction Filmmaking: "The Memory Loss Tapes," HBO.

Writing for Nonfiction Programming: "Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired," HBO.

Sound Editing for a Series: "Battlestar Galactica: Daybreak (Part 2)," Syfy.

Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special: "Generation Kill: The Cradle of Civilization," HBO.

Sound Editing for Nonfiction Programming (Single or Multi-Camera): "102 Minutes That Changed America," History.

Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One Hour): "House: House Divided," Fox.

Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or Movie: "Generation Kill: The Cradle of Civilization," HBO.

Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour and Animation): "Entourage: Pie," HBO, and "Weeds: Three Coolers," Showtime.

Sound Mixing for a Variety or Music Series or a Special: "81st Annual Academy Awards," ABC, and "The 51st Annual Grammy Awards," CBS.

Sound Mixing for Nonfiction Programming (Single or Multi-Camera): "102 Minutes That Changed America," History.

Special Visual Effects for a Series: "Heroes: The Second Coming/The Butterfly Effect," NBC.

Special Visual Effects for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special: "Generation Kill: The Cradle of Civilization," HBO.

Stunt Coordination: "Chuck: Chuck Versus the First Date," NBC.

Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control for a Series: "American Idol: Episode 834A," Fox.

Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special: "Beijing 2008 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony," NBC.

Voice-Over Performance: "The Simpsons: Father Knows Worst," Fox.

Writing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Special: "Chris Rock - Kill The Messenger," HBO.