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OUR VIEW: All teachers deserve a little praise

Staff Photo: Jonathan Phillips
 2010 Gwinnett County Teacher of the Year Deborah Stringfellow, left, is congratulated by colleague Malinda Day at the Gwinnett Center on Thursday. 

Staff Photo: Jonathan Phillips 2010 Gwinnett County Teacher of the Year Deborah Stringfellow, left, is congratulated by colleague Malinda Day at the Gwinnett Center on Thursday. 

In a county that prides itself on its public schools, there aren't many honors grander than being named Teacher of the Year. Deborah Stringfellow became the latest to earn that title, celebrating her birthday Thursday night by finding out she had won the award at a banquet at Gwinnett Center.

It's quite an honor for the seventh-grade science teacher from Crews Middle School. A 24-year teaching veteran, Stringfellow has spent the last six in Gwinnett. And through a combination of language arts and creative thinking, she's made her mark in the science department at Crews.

She accelerates the learning process by requiring students to write about the experiments they do and explain the thought process they used to complete the assignment. Those requirements force the students to be analytical while at the same time bolstering their enthusiasm for the subject.

It's teachers like this that make Gwinnett County Public Schools so respected, both locally and on the national level. Stringfellow is an impressive winner, and is also representative of the strong teaching staff that helps make GCPS' reputation.

Also deserving congratulations are the other Teacher of the Year finalists: James Glenn of Norcross High, Joe Cox of Brookwood High, Jennifer Rolfes of Mill Creek High, Chuck Lockert of the Gwinnett School of Science, Mathematics and Technology, and Mark Landtroop of Winn Holt Elementary.

In all, 112 teachers were honored at Thursday night's banquet. And while it was Stringfellow who got a birthday present to remember, it was a night to also recognize what a difference all Gwinnett teachers make.

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