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The Grascals make stop in Suwannee

Special Photo. Bluegrass band The Grascals, from left to right, Danny Roberts, Terry Eldredge, Jeremy Abshire, Kristin Scott Benson, Terry Smith and Jamie Johnson, will perform Saturday at Everett Brothers Music Barn in Suwanee.

Special Photo. Bluegrass band The Grascals, from left to right, Danny Roberts, Terry Eldredge, Jeremy Abshire, Kristin Scott Benson, Terry Smith and Jamie Johnson, will perform Saturday at Everett Brothers Music Barn in Suwanee.

A high lead vocal with a baritone voice underneath makes up the harmonies of The Grascals.

"They're some of the best harmony vocals you'll hear in bluegrass," Diane Dunaway said.

Those harmonies, as well as the accompanying instrumentation, will be showcased Saturday at the Everett Brothers Music Barn.

Coming off the Jekyll Island Bluegrass Festival, The Grascals will make a tour stop in Suwanee for at least the second consecutive year.

"They're a fine group of entertainers," said Dunaway, a member of the Everett family, who run the bluegrass venue.

Two guitars, an upright bass, a mandolin, a banjo and a fiddle fill in bluegrass sound of the six-member band, which is based in Nashville and has performed with the likes of country songstress Dolly Parton.

The Grammy-nominated band was the 2007 International Bluegrass Music Association's Entertainers of the Year, an award they also took home in 2006, just one year after being named Emerging Artist of the Year and snagging the nod for Song of the Year for "Me and John and Paul."

Jamie Johnson, vocalist and guitarist, said that's one of the songs fans always expect to hear.

"We always dedicate that to the troops," he said. "It's by far about the most significant song in our career."

Along with songs off their first three albums, Gwinnett residents will get a sneak peek of about half the songs off the band's upcoming record, "The Famous Lefty Flynn," set to be released in March.

The album takes its name from a character Johnson dreamed up, the bank-robbing, smooth-talking, good-looking Lefty Flynn.

"The whole song is this guy who got to share this (jail) cell with him," Johnson said.

After the duo break out of jail, Lefty is shot and killed. His partner in crime for the brief stint escapes to Mexico, where he opens a bar in Lefty's honor.

Sometimes described as a super group, a band made up of musicians previously established in the industry, The Grascals' sound spans traditional and more contemporary bluegrass and their show is high energy.

"We always give at least 110 percent," Johnson said. "When we toured with Dolly she taught us to leave everything except your clothes on the stage. We take pride in not only trying to put a smile on somebody's face, but giving them the 110 percent of entertainment of playing each instrument and singing each part and making sure it's right."