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NATION IN BRIEF: Police seek 2 in armored car heist in Vegas

The Associated Press. Officials investigate the armored car robbery in front of the Palace Station in Las Vegas on Monday.  Las Vegas police said appeared to be a well-planned daylight heist in the parking lot of a Las Vegas casino. A bag containing $1 million in checks, receipts and $36,000 in cash was taken.

The Associated Press. Officials investigate the armored car robbery in front of the Palace Station in Las Vegas on Monday. Las Vegas police said appeared to be a well-planned daylight heist in the parking lot of a Las Vegas casino. A bag containing $1 million in checks, receipts and $36,000 in cash was taken.

Police seek 2 in armored car heist in Vegas

LAS VEGAS -- Armored car robbers, including one toting a shotgun, made off Monday with a $1 million money bag in what police said appeared to be a well-planned daylight heist in the parking lot of a Las Vegas casino.

It's not clear, however, if the bandits realized the bag contained just $36,000 in cash, with checks and other receipts accounting for the rest of its contents.

Investigators were trying to determine if a vehicle fire that drew casino security guards to a parking structure was a diversion related to the robbery outside Palace Station Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas police Lt. Clinton Nichols said.

Legionnaires' hits 3 former guests of hotel

MIAMI -- About 300 guests have been moved from a luxury Miami hotel after Legionnaires' disease struck at least three former guests since October.

Health officials said Monday that one former guest at the EPIC Hotel died at the end of October after leaving for a cruise. The other two guests fell ill in November.

Investigators found the hotel installed a water filter powerful enough to remove chlorine from its city-supplied water, encouraging bacterial growth.

Current guests were sent to nearby hotels Saturday to prevent potential contact with the bacterial disease that can be transmitted by contaminated water vapor.

Helicopter extends search for 2 climbers

GOVERNMENT CAMP, Ore. -- A military helicopter searched upper elevations of Mount Hood on Monday, as rescuers held onto hope that two experienced climbers would be found alive after a third member of their party was discovered dead over the weekend.

Search teams were working against time, with a new storm expected to hit Oregon's highest peak overnight.

Taking advantage of a brief break in the weather, a Black Hawk helicopter operated by the Oregon Army National Guard searched for signs of life or debris.

Mountaineers found the body of Luke T. Gullberg, 26, of Des Moines, Wash., on Saturday at the 9,000-foot level on Reid Glacier.

Airline blames Buffalo crash on pilot error

ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- A pilot's inattention and failure to follow safety rules likely caused a commuter plane to plummet from the sky near Buffalo in February, killing 50 people, the airline told federal investigators.

The twin-engine turboprop also lacked an adequate system to warn the pilots when the plane was flying too slowly, contributing to the tragedy, said Colgan Air Inc.

''The probable cause of the accident was the flight crew's loss of situational awareness and failure to follow Colgan Air training and procedures, which led to a loss of control of the aircraft,'' Colgan Air said in a Dec. 7 report to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Missing Bush White House e-mails found

WASHINGTON -- Computer technicians have found 22 million missing White House e-mails from the administration of President George W. Bush and the Obama administration is searching for dozens more days' worth of potentially lost e-mail from the Bush years, according to two groups that filed suit over the failure by the Bush White House to install an electronic record keeping system.

The two private groups -- Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington and the National Security Archive -- said Monday they were settling the lawsuits they filed against the Executive Office of the President in 2007.

Judge OKs winter solstice display at capitol

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- A federal judge said a nonreligious winter solstice display featuring Bill Gates and Albert Einstein can be placed at the Arkansas Capitol.

The Arkansas Society of Freethinkers sued after the secretary of state's office rejected its proposal to counter a traditional nativity scene with the display.

U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright ruled Monday in favor of the group. The freethinkers had accused the secretary of state of violating the group's constitutional rights by not allowing its display.