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Who's looking out for the Christians?

Bill O'Reilly

Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers reminds me of June Cleaver, who birthed Beaver and Wally in 1960s sitcom land. Standing next to President Bush, I kept envisioning Harriet holding a tray of cookies for the president and any senator who might want one.

Now I realize this portrayal of Miers is immature and possibly offensive to people who resent this kind of foolishness when professional women are involved. But trust me, my daydream about Miers is not nearly as offensive as what is going on in some media precincts. Many conservative pundits don't like Miers because she's not "right" enough. And some lefties believe she's not qualified to serve her country because she's a practicing Christian.

Writing in the secular temple that is The New York Times, columnist Maureen Dowd states: "(President Bush) is asking for a triple leap of faith. He has faith in Ms. Miers as his lawyer and as a woman who shares his faith. And we're expected to have faith in his faith and her faith that could change the balance of the court and affect women's rights for the next generation."

Of course Dowd worships at the altar of Roe v. Wade, and any person who might be pro-life is automatically unsuitable in her mind to hold a decision-making position. But the truth is, Miers has not publicly stated her position on abortion and probably will never do so. Thus, Dowd is objecting to Miers because she attends an Evangelical Christian Church in Texas, and we can't have those kinds of people on the court, can we?

Some liberal journalists and politicians are clearly saying conservative Christians need not apply to serve their country. This, of course, is outrageous and unconstitutional. If that kind of bias were directed at any other American group, there would be hell to pay. But Christians are fair game for media scorn, mockery and dismissal.

A recent Gallup survey puts the number of Americans who call themselves Christians at 84 percent, and that kind of majority is dangerous to the goals of the secular-progressive movement. The main opposition to things like gay marriage, euthanasia, legalized drugs and all kinds of abortion on demand for any girl or woman are faith-based people who form judgments about behavior and object to a society that does not. If you eliminate people of faith from positions of power in the USA, well, hello, Holland.

It is worth noting that according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors, journalists are much less "Christian" than the country as a whole. A 1997 study says 59 percent of newspaper people call themselves Catholic or Protestant and 20 percent say they don't believe in God at all. According to Gallup, just 9 percent of the American population is atheist or agnostic.

Mark my words, in the weeks to come, you will hear all kinds of anti-Christian stuff in the media when Harriet Miers is being discussed. Some of it will be subtle, but not all. This is a clip-and-save moment. The secular media knows Ms. Miers will be confirmed to the Supreme Court, but they will get their anti-Christian digs in during the process.

As a Christian, I have already forgiven my misguided peers for what they will inevitably do. Also, after 12 years of Catholic school, I know a thing or two about demons. The demonization of Harriet Miers will be very instructive to watch. And she looks like such a nice woman.

Veteran TV news anchor and author Bill O'Reilly is a host on Fox News. His column appears on Friday.